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Thread: canon advice

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ben-s View Post
    Sounds like either would be a good choice... Good luck
    thank you! A week and one day till the next paycheck comes in so hopefully I'll be placing my order a week from monday.

  2. #22

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    Sounds like you've got all good advice already. Just wanted to say The Elan 7 is a great camera - I've been meaning to pick one up for a quiet alternative since they are so dang cheap.

    Definitely have an 3 in future. For $350ish, it's got to be an awesome camera. I don't have one - I sprung the extra money for a used 1V which is just amazing. I figured why not shoot with one of the best Canon film cameras while I still can - haven't regretted it for a minute. But, its not that much different than a 3 when you get down to it.

    The nicest thing about the 3 and the 1V, besides the build quality and feel, is the spot meter. Can't remember if the Elan has a spot meter...

  3. #23
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    I believe the Elan 7 (7N?) is the same as the EOS 30 (or 33?) in the UK - I have an EOS 30 and it's a pretty good body, especially considdering I only paid £25 for it on ebay! :-)

    I have used an EOS 3 and yes it is a better built camera with a few more functions etc. but for general usage i don't think you can beat the EOS 30 or 33.

    The only thing I find a PITA on the EOS 30 is the fact that it doesn't have a backlight on the LCD display - I believe the EOS33 (the slightly newer model) does.

    Of course it all comes down to money...
    --Kevin--

  4. #24

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    I have a 5 (N.B. apparently the US version doesnt have the same over/under exposure scale) and it does what is says on the tin (i.e. more than I can make use of). Any of the "pro-sumer" EOSs are good and will do whatever you ask of them. FWIW my 2p is I will say that having an onboard flash can be good for those times when you need a bit of infill. have a look at photonotes.org for somne comparisons if you're still stuck.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Sounds like you've got all good advice already. Just wanted to say The Elan 7 is a great camera - I've been meaning to pick one up for a quiet alternative since they are so dang cheap.

    Definitely have an 3 in future. For $350ish, it's got to be an awesome camera. I don't have one - I sprung the extra money for a used 1V which is just amazing. I figured why not shoot with one of the best Canon film cameras while I still can - haven't regretted it for a minute. But, its not that much different than a 3 when you get down to it.

    The nicest thing about the 3 and the 1V, besides the build quality and feel, is the spot meter. Can't remember if the Elan has a spot meter...
    The Elan has a "partial spot" meter that covers about 10% of the frame.

    I bought an Elan from KEH a few years back and promptly returned it. It's a quiet camera but it's low-light AF does not perform well and it lacks a true spot meter. I found it felt flimsy, though some might disagree.

    I returned it and bought a used EOS-5 (identical to the A2E). The 5 is every bit as quiet as the Elan, has a better spot meter (3.3% - still not a TRUE spot, IMO), and has much better low-light AF. The only drawbacks I find are a slight increase in weight (though more than justified by its better build), its incomatability with E-TTL flashes (not significant for me since I use a Sunpak 383 AutoFlash), and the aforementioned command switch problem. My switch broke the very day I received the camera and KEH fixed it under warranty. It has not troubled me again, though I mostly shoot my M42 cameras these days.

    These days the EOS-3 costs less than the EOS-5 did four years ago, has better metering and AF performance, is weather-proof, supports E-TTL, and has better build with no known reliability problems. It's a bit heavier and noisier than the 5, but I think it would be the way to go.

    Most 3's seem to have been owned by yuppies who bought them and promptly stuck them in the closet, too, rather than professionals who put them trough their paces on a daily basis. There's a fair chance, as a result, that the mechanical components will have many, many fewer cycles on them than a 1N or 1V.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  6. #26

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    The only known problem with the EOS 3 is that some early models exhibit an underexposure metering problem. Some early adopters of the camera sent theirs in for a firmware upgrade, but I heard that Canon fixed the later batch of cameras. But wow, is it a nice camera. It is significantly heavier and bulkier compared to the Elan 7-series or Rebel cameras, but it's built well and takes a beating. Mine has gone through snow and rain, and it keeps on going.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by aldevo View Post
    Most 3's seem to have been owned by yuppies who bought them and promptly stuck them in the closet, too, rather than professionals who put them trough their paces on a daily basis. There's a fair chance, as a result, that the mechanical components will have many, many fewer cycles on them than a 1N or 1V.
    Good point. I think the 1V I got had 210 rolls put through it. If not, maybe it was 1210 (it has a counter).

    I'm sure I would be happy with a 3, but the 1V is just fucking awesome. Sorry for the language. Came with the software link thing and a power booster (which I never use). I felt like I got it for a song since it was about the same price as a digital rebel.

    For a lighter more compact camera I have my rangefinder.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Good point. I think the 1V I got had 210 rolls put through it. If not, maybe it was 1210 (it has a counter).

    I'm sure I would be happy with a 3, but the 1V is just fucking awesome. Sorry for the language. Came with the software link thing and a power booster (which I never use). I felt like I got it for a song since it was about the same price as a digital rebel.

    For a lighter more compact camera I have my rangefinder.
    what exactly does the software link do?

  9. #29

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    Lets you set various personal functions (like custom functions, but less useful ). More importantly, the camera records all kinds of things for each exposure. The software link lets you retrieve that stuff. Kind of like EXIF for digital cameras. Aperture, shutter speed, ISO, active focus point, time taken, etc. For the most part, its completely useless, but it came with the camera and I have a record of exposures if I ever really wanted them.

    I think the camera stores 50-100 rolls worth of data depending on what you set it up to store.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Lets you set various personal functions (like custom functions, but less useful ). More importantly, the camera records all kinds of things for each exposure. The software link lets you retrieve that stuff. Kind of like EXIF for digital cameras. Aperture, shutter speed, ISO, active focus point, time taken, etc. For the most part, its completely useless, but it came with the camera and I have a record of exposures if I ever really wanted them.

    I think the camera stores 50-100 rolls worth of data depending on what you set it up to store.
    That's usefull I think. One of few things I absolutely love about digital is the exif info instead of writing down or forgetting to write down my shot settings.

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