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  1. #11

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    Get a 28mm 2.8, 50mm 1.4 and 85mm 1.8 and you'll be set for life.

  2. #12
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Mike,

    There is Nikkor "consumer" glasstic and there is real Nikkor glass.

    First determine which yours is. A quick and dirty test is whether or not it is Made in Japan (that's where the "good stuff" comes from) versus Malaysia or The Phillipines.

    As far as I'm concerned, Nikkor "consumer glasstic" is no better than Sigma or other 3rd party manufacturers. So getting rid of the Nikkor as "redundant" would make sense if it is only consumer quality.

    But if it is the good stuff - keep the Nikkor and build your own kit around it with other quality Nikkor glass as you're means permit.

    I've got some third party glass from kits, as well as some of the Nikkor consumer quality stuff. It's generally okay optically - but it's made of cheap plastic and likely to fail sooner rather than later and is hardly the stuff that once made "real" Nikkor glass a legend.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    Get a 28mm 2.8, 50mm 1.4 and 85mm 1.8 and you'll be set for life.
    Variation on the above, which is a great selection in itself:

    24mm 2.8; 50mm 1.8; 85mm 1.8

    I agree with the set for life sentiments.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    Get a 28mm 2.8, 50mm 1.4 and 85mm 1.8 and you'll be set for life.
    I have a 50mm and a 85mm and though they are both good lenses I find them to close in focallenght.
    Kind regards
    Søren
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

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  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    If you like to shoot wide angle photographs, consider the Nikon f/2.8 AF 20mm to 35mm zoom which is much cheaper than the Nikon f/2.8 AF 17mm to 35mm zoom.

    I use the Nikon f/2.8 AF 20mm to 35mm zoom and the Tamron f3.6 AF 28mm to 300mm zoom. Between the two they cover everything I shoot in 35mm.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    You need a 20mm. As they say,

    "Go wide or go home!"

    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  7. #17

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    Or as Robert Capa once said, "if your pictures aren't good enough, you aren't close enough." And I totally agree. Wide and close is good.

  8. #18
    spiralcity's Avatar
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    I've got some third party glass from kits, as well as some of the Nikkor consumer quality stuff. It's generally okay optically - but it's made of cheap plastic and likely to fail sooner rather than later and is hardly the stuff that once made "real" Nikkor glass a legend.
    I do know there are a few lenses made for the consumer that were manufactured outside of Japan. One of the first was the 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D AF. I dont believe the lens elements are made of plastic. I do know that the lens mounting ring was constucted of high density plastic.

    The plastic you refer to is the mount and barrel and not the elements I assume?

  9. #19
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Some of the consumer-grade lenses that have aspherical elements have plastic aspherics. The 28-70/3.5-4.5D comes to mind, although I'm not sure about that lens specifically. The non-aspherical optics are always glass, though.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  10. #20

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    I've got a 20, 35 and 85 which covers my needs for the most part (A 1.5x TC handles most of the rest when mounted to the 85).

    My non-Nikon body has a 24-105 on it, which is about the same (although I miss the speed of the 35 and 85 primes).

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