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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    Tougher, faster, and better for event/people photography.
    Doesn't this say Leica?
    I wouldn't care about the F5. If you really want some Pro 35mm SLR for people shooting go for an F100 instead. A lot of the danish press photographers in the late -90 took F100s to Kosovo, Somalia etc with either a couple of primes or the 20-35 zoom because its a more handy camera and it did the job just as well as the F5 would. I have shot with a F90X for some years now and just got a F100 a year or so ago, Neither leaves me wanting anything. Another way to go for people shots is the Mamiya 7II. Ok the lenses are slow but with 6X7cm negs you can afford to shoot fast films without loosing much in quality. Like the Leicas its a rangefinder with a god bright finder and excelent lenses.
    Kind regards
    Søren
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  2. #22
    roteague's Avatar
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    I would go with the F5 if you expect to keep the camera for a long time. They are practically indestructible. The only real problem I have seen with them is the battery life is a bit short. I have an F5 - I have since upgraded to an F6 (which is probably out of your reach) - and I wouldn't trade it for a F100 or N80 for any use, neither is in the same class as the F5. Keep in mind, the F5 is a very big, heavy camera.
    Robert M. Teague
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    Tougher, faster, and better for event/people photography.
    For event photography, it'll be easier with a camera with a spot-meter and flash capabilities. People photography isn't as demanding. As I've said before, the F100 will do well in both. You don't need a top-range SLR to do event/people photography.

  4. #24
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Check out www.shutterblade.com . It's an eBay store and I have, at least in part, privately funded them lately. They are 100% reliable in my book. Check them out.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #25

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    Of course the OP may be a big heavy lad as well and he's still got some growing to do in the physical sense. He might be ready for the bigness of the F5 or grow into its bigness quite quickly.

    I had a BSA single cylinder motorcycle once. It looked a bit like the famous 500cc Goldstar. It was heavy and had a big 5 gallon tank. It fulfilled my dreams.

    Was it better than other smaller British motorcycles. NO. Was it faster than other machines or even as fast as Japanese 250s.NO

    So why? Well I refer back to last line of the previous paragraph but one.

    Have we all chosen our wives/husbands according to strict needs and logical deduction. Would we have been better/happier if we had?

    That concludes the case for the defence, m'lud( your honour?) which I now rest.

    pentaxuser

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    I'm going to ask for a good Gitzo tripod for christmas. This one: http://www.gitzo.com/Jahia/site/gitz...detailPid=5230

    Sorry for the long link, and I'm getting the F5 when my Pentax spotmatic/SP 500 breaks. When do you think that wil be? I only dropped it once.
    A strong suggestion, Marko. Before you decide which tripod you want, if you can manage it go to the store and lean on every one they have.

    I replaced my Bogen 3021 leg set a couple of years ago after it got old and, um, wobbly in the knees. No matter how it was tightened up, the leg sections would move a tiny bit against each other. Not a problem with a short lens, but because the platform could rotate a little a bad problem with long lenses.

    My wife and I trekked up to B&H where I found to my horror that most of the leg sets they had, including new 3021s, had the same problem. I ended up with a Berlebach. I know B&H is a little far for you. Another one to look for, if you can bear to live with a 12 pound monstrosity, is the large Zone VI. Too much for me, I had a chance to buy one the day I bought my Berlebach. But it is by god solid.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    Pentax SP500/Spotmatic
    35mm f3.5
    55mm f1.8
    105mm f2.8
    Pentax Spotmeter V
    Metz flash
    Flash bracket.
    Filters/film
    Marko, thanks for the list. When I bought my first real camera, a Nikkormat FTN, it came with a little pamphlet on 35 mm photography that I still have. Best short introduction to photography I've ever seen.

    The pamphlet contained, besides good basic education with (no kidding) homework exercises, Nikon's recommendations on on lenses after the first one. They suggested starting with a normal lens, by which they meant 50 mm, not 43. And then doubling or halving focal length, and so on. If you replace your 35 with a 25 or so and add a 200 you'll have the complement of lenses for 35 mm that has served me well since the early '70s.

    I didn't like Spotmatics back when (that's one of the reasons why I bought a Nikkormat) and don't now, but they are perfectly usable and will do everything you might want to do that doesn't require "auto very much." If I were you and were being sane, I'd add at most two prime (25, 200) lenses and, perhaps, another body. The body not so much as a spare as to let me use two different emulsions at the same time.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Dan

  8. #28
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Dan, I went to the local store, [about 15km away, biked] and this was the most sturdy tripod there. I think its very stable.
    Marko Kovacevic
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  9. #29
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Agree wth most other posters, would add that it is important to understand that top-of-the-range 35 mm cameras are designed to be ultra-tough do-anything system cameras. If, for example, you don't need interchangeable finders, mirror lock-up, interchangeable screens and the toughness to run all day on motor drive or be lugged around with a really heavy 600 to 1000 mm telephoto lens attached without distorting the body, you could very find that a Nikon F90/F100 was just as good as an F5/F6 and much lighter and more pleasant to carry. I personally use F3's for "scientific" purposes, they have everything I'm looking for. Obviously the best thing about a system camera is that you can configure it exactly to your needs - and only you know what these needs are. The ESSENTIALS for a 35 mm camera are one camera body, one lens (probably but not necessarily a 35 or 50), some form of metering (either built-in or separate) and film - a lot of film!

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by ehparis View Post
    F3
    35 f1.4
    85 f1.4
    Gitzo

    And the world is your oyster.

    Agreed, but those are some co$tly lenses. I say:

    F3
    28 f2.8
    50 f1.8
    105 f2.5

    My setup exactly

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