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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    I'm not positive, but what probably happened was this (making up names and random other bids):

    • Starting price: $100
    • Fred: Bids $150; current price $100
    • You: Bid $377; current price $101 (Fred's $100 plus $1 increment)
    • Sally: Bid $734; current price $382 (Your $377 plus $5 increment)
    • Dale: Bid $800; current price $739 (Sally's $734 plus $5 increment)
    • Auction ends: Dale wins at $739


    In this scenario, the summary wouldn't show a $382 price because nobody bid that amount as a maximum bid. The $382 price was just your bid plus the increment (which I'm supposing was $5 at that level, although I don't recall the precise eBay bid increment values and their associated bid levels). I'm not positive, but I believe the bid summary screen shows losing bidders' top bids; only the current high bid is shown, not the high bids through the whole sequence. If you don't understand this, I suggest you read up on eBay's proxy bidding system. This seems to confuse a lot of people, but once you understand it it's not that hard a concept to grasp.
    Makes sense and that is how I figured it worked BUT then name or code name assc. with 382 disappeared also.
    I watch names, codes, closely.
    The winning bidder, eventually nine hundred something, only appeared once and three names minus mr.x were between me and the end.

    Not important but odd.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobbyR View Post
    Makes sense and that is how I figured it worked BUT then name or code name assc. with 382 disappeared also.
    I watch names, codes, closely.
    Are you saying that the user who initially outbid you didn't appear in the final list of bidders? If so, then my guess is that the bid was withdrawn or invalidated. I've seen this sort of thing happen before. I don't know the precise conditions under which eBay allows it, but it can happen -- say if a bidder claims to have made a mistake in placing a bid or if the user's eBay account is shut down mid-auction.

  3. #63

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    Now I know some of you think 390 dollars for F2AS is too much, but as of late they sell in the range of 450 plus or minus twenty to thirty; one gent proved the race is to the sure, not the swift.

    Henry's in Canada ran one starting at 399.99 and "buy it now" of 527.75.
    It ran with out a bid; the day after that auction ended it was back up with a starting price of 391.99.
    No one bid until the day before that one ended; there was one bid and the gent got if for 391.99.

    Not cheap but at the prices of late, not bad at all.
    Bobby

  4. #64

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    I haven't read all the posts, but here are some thoughts about ebay bidding. This is based on roughly 400 ebay transactions (probably more). I probably win the bid on well under 5% of the items I bid on. For items I really really really want that figure might rise to 10-20%.

    Although there are some bargains to be found on ebay, it is mostly a seller market. To avoid over paying you need to keep your bids low, which means you will lose most of the bids.

    This leads to my rule of thumb for ebay purchases: Low ball your bids and plan on losing most of the bids. If you are winning a large percentage of your bids (say more than 20% at the highest) you are probably paying too much.

  5. #65

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    A couple of other tips. Sniping programs and services have already been mentioned several times. They are an excellent way to bid on ebay.

    If the current bid on an item is extremely low (often the case for a new listing) it is sometimes better to place the minimum bid rather than putting the item on your watch list. There are two reasons: 1) It means you will not use up your limit of items for the watch list and 2) it reduces the likelyhood that the seller will cancel the auction early, which often happens for items with no bids that are approaching the auction expiration time.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post
    This leads to my rule of thumb for ebay purchases: Low ball your bids and plan on losing most of the bids. If you are winning a large percentage of your bids (say more than 20% at the highest) you are probably paying too much.
    I will have to agree with this one hundred percent, I was just browsing through some of the high priced EOS items, and every once in awhile some one gets one for dirt cheap prices.

  7. #67

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    Concerning lowball bids: It's a question of time vs. money. If you've got hours upon hours to search through eBay listings, and if you don't need an item soon, you can get great bargains by lowball bidding. This strategy places a rather low value on your own time, though. Remember, you've got to read the auction to spot any "gotchas" ("a few cleaning marks" on a lens, sellers with 80% approval ratings, shipping costs, etc.), and in some cases research specific products. All this can add up to several minutes per auction, or even hours if you're bidding on unique items that require a lot of research. I'm certainly not going to waste an hour of my time to save $5 on an auction for film (that's why I seldom buy film on eBay -- it's usually cheaper at B&H or Freestyle, especially when you consider my time costs). I might spend an hour or two placing a couple dozen bids on a pricey lens if it means saving $200, though. Of course, if you enjoy futzing around on eBay, that's another matter, but if you view it from a more pragmatic point of view, remember to factor in your own time when you go with the lowball bidding strategy.

  8. #68

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    Having read that some here are quasi-to genuine ebay pros, I watched an auction finish just now with with sniping extraordinaire.

    It was an EOS 3 which was quite low priced, especially as it had the manuals.

    I do a search in ebay for things that I find especially interesting and put them in my "favorite places" , for quick retrieve and view them as I think of them.

    If I forget them and miss the auction no biggie.

    I decided I absolutely do not need an EOS 3 but it is a nice camera and the price seemed low and too stable.
    When the auction hit the last minute I continually hit the refresh button and watched it go from 177 to 224 in the last twenty seconds.
    The two who were sniping had no previous bids on it.
    Fascinating.
    Bobby

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