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  1. #1

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    Fujica ST705 or other Fujica SLRs.

    Hi all... I have a question... probably a very stupid one.

    For anyone who's used a Fujica ST705, or a ST605 or any from the same era... is it normal for the film to load onto the take-up spool clockwise? In other words, whereas on most 35mm cameras (and in fact most cameras I have used) the film goes 'around' the take-up spool with the film's emulsion facing inwards and the glossier side facing outwards, on my ST705 it goes the other way, with the emulsion facing outwards!

    Somehow this seems 'wrong'... like it may be putting stress on the film or potentially damaging the emulsion. Plus it's not as easy to load film as with the 'normal' method... so is this normal for a Fujica? Or do I just have a faulty one?

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts on this.

  2. #2
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Emulsion facing out is very common. Most of my 35mm cameras work that way, and most that I can recall.

    Lee

  3. #3

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    I was under the impression that it was more common for the base (i.e. the shiny side) to face outwards, than the emulsion (the dull side). This has been the case on my various compacts, 35mm SLRs, 35mm RFs, 6x7 SLR and 6x6 TLRs. I was under the impression that it was the norm...

    To illustrate my point, here's the first image I could google for 'loading film'... a 'how to' for beginners...



    That (at least the image on the left) is what I would consider the "normal" way... see how the film goes around the outside of the take-up spool (the one on the left), winding anti-clockwise. But on my Fujica, it loads onto the spool on the 'inside' and winds clockwise.

    I did a quick bit of editing of the above image to show you how film loads on the Fujica (ignore the 'right and 'wrong')...

    Last edited by ZaphodB; 12-03-2007 at 08:36 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4

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    I just checked my Fujica ST801, and its take up spool counter-rolls the film (emulsion side out). So do all but one of my Russian and Soviet cameras, my Vivitar V3800N, and I think my Chinon CE-4s (it's got film loaded at the moment, so I can't check it). My 35mm cameras that roll the film emulsion side in on the take-up spool are, with one exception, all cameras with built-in motor drives -- my Ricoh XR-X 3PF, Zenit KM, Canon SureShot, and Minolta Explorer. The one non-motorized camera I've got that loads this way is my Pentax P30t.

    So in summary, this is extremely common, particularly on older cameras without motor drives. I wouldn't worry about it, with one caveat: If you leave the film in the camera for a long time, it'll acquire a counter-curl. I'm not positive, but I suspect this may be a factor in loading difficulties when using plastic developing tank spools; with the film trying to curl out, the film tip tries to gouge into the outer track of its spool as it's pushed further into the reel. This is just a hypothesis, though, and even if it's correct, it would only affect loading film onto plastic reels. Leaving the film rewound in its cartridge for a day or two would probably reduce or even reverse the counter-curl, but I've not done any experimentation to find out. (I mostly use SS reels, and the counter-curl isn't an issue when loading them.)

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    I just checked my Fujica ST801, and its take up spool counter-rolls the film (emulsion side out). So do all but one of my Russian and Soviet cameras, my Vivitar V3800N, and I think my Chinon CE-4s (it's got film loaded at the moment, so I can't check it). My 35mm cameras that roll the film emulsion side in on the take-up spool are, with one exception, all cameras with built-in motor drives -- my Ricoh XR-X 3PF, Zenit KM, Canon SureShot, and Minolta Explorer. The one non-motorized camera I've got that loads this way is my Pentax P30t.

    So in summary, this is extremely common, particularly on older cameras without motor drives. I wouldn't worry about it, with one caveat: If you leave the film in the camera for a long time, it'll acquire a counter-curl. I'm not positive, but I suspect this may be a factor in loading difficulties when using plastic developing tank spools; with the film trying to curl out, the film tip tries to gouge into the outer track of its spool as it's pushed further into the reel. This is just a hypothesis, though, and even if it's correct, it would only affect loading film onto plastic reels. Leaving the film rewound in its cartridge for a day or two would probably reduce or even reverse the counter-curl, but I've not done any experimentation to find out. (I mostly use SS reels, and the counter-curl isn't an issue when loading them.)
    Thanks for your reply. I'm sure I have used other traditional SLRs that load this way, but the only other ones I remember are the Spotmatic, a Nikon, and I think one of the old Minoltas. Most if not all the rest have loaded with emulsion side facing out on the spool. Like you, all the modern auto SLRs I've used have loaded with emulsion side in on the spool, as have all of the compacts including some old uncoupled RFs, etc, and medium format TLRs and SLRs too.

    You mention counter-curl, and to me it seemed odd and potentially not a good idea that between the cartridge and the reel the film gets curled two ways. I just can't see much benefit to loading it this way. I probably wouldn't have thought it odd, as it's not unique to this camera, except that on the Fujica it somehow seems... just wrong... As though the spool is actually designed to take film the other way (it's much easier to actually get the film onto the reel with the emulsion facing in). Just didn't feel right somehow... I guess it's just me
    Last edited by ZaphodB; 12-03-2007 at 10:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    spiralcity's Avatar
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    I collect Fujica cameras. I own a ST705, ST705W, ST605N, ST801 and a AZ-1. They all load the same way. As a matter of fact they load just like my Nikons, no different.

    If you own a Nikon you'll see the loading is the same. As a matter of fact I believe most SLR's load this way. My old Minolta loaded the same way also.

    Their is no extra tension on the spool when loading this way. As a matter of fact, after loading your film your should turn your silver handle crank clockwise until you feel a bit of tension. This will take the film slack out and help lay the film flat.
    Last edited by spiralcity; 12-04-2007 at 12:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZaphodB View Post
    Thanks for your reply. I'm sure I have used other traditional SLRs that load this way, but the only other ones I remember are the Spotmatic, a Nikon, and I think one of the old Minoltas. Most if not all the rest have loaded with emulsion side facing out on the spool. Like you, all the modern auto SLRs I've used have loaded with emulsion side in on the spool, as have all of the compacts including some old uncoupled RFs, etc, and medium format TLRs and SLRs too.

    You mention counter-curl, and to me it seemed odd and potentially not a good idea that between the cartridge and the reel the film gets curled two ways. I just can't see much benefit to loading it this way. I probably wouldn't have thought it odd, as it's not unique to this camera, except that on the Fujica it somehow seems... just wrong... As though the spool is actually designed to take film the other way (it's much easier to actually get the film onto the reel with the emulsion facing in). Just didn't feel right somehow... I guess it's just me
    My Pentax Spotmatic loads with the spool going clockwise, and the emulsion side out.

  8. #8

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    My Pentax ME Super loads the same way, clockwise rotation/emulsion side out.

  9. #9

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    It is very commom for that era cameras, I have had several and the take up spool always wound emulsion side out,Richard

  10. #10
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    And there are cameras like the 35mm Rolleis that take up the film emulsion side out and load right-to-left (frame numbers upside-down).

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