Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,331   Posts: 1,537,293   Online: 1040
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,595

    Protecting camera/lens from blowing snow.

    We just had our first major snow storm of the season dumping 30cm so far and it's still coming down.The wind is also a factor (65kph)and white outs are being reported on the radio.
    What to do,what to do. Shovel myself out or grab my winter camera and hit the trail for a bit of a morning shoot? Obvious isn't it?
    I shall be using a Nikkormat FT2 loaded with Tri-X and Nikkor 28mm lens packed into my go anywhere WWII medics shoulder bag.
    Even though the FT2 is my beater I still want to protect it from storm damage.Any advice?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    420
    Images
    5
    Maybe 'cause I shoot the same camera at times, but prefer a different focal length, I have to say you've probably got one of the most durable set-ups for inclement weather. I think the sealed pentaprism gives an advantage over the F series for blowing conditions. Perhaps a different lube, with cold weather in mind, would give a slight advantage....but Tri-X would have plenty of lattitude to compensate for sluggish shutters.

    As far as extra protection, perhaps a plastic bag taped to the UV filter would help ease your mind. My Nikkormat has survived years of outdoor shooting, including driving rain and snow during PJ football game work, with no ill affects. Have it CLA'd every few years and I'll bet you're OK. If you're worried, try a Nikonos with a 28, or a AF35AW (35mm FL, but slightly less expensive than the 'nos). The Action Touch is electronic, so I don't prefer it in the cold.

    I think you've got a great set-up, and other than the bag, wouldn't do much besides keeping it in my parka during a blizzard.

  3. #3
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brandon, MB
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,738
    Images
    332
    I'd be more careful coming in FROM the cold - the warm moist air inside will fog up your gear almost instantly. Keep it in a bag (plastic or otherwise) and give it time to gradually warm up before taking it out. Over time, that moisture will form mold and such on your lens elements. Some silica gel inside the bag won't hurt, either.

    Snow shouldn't pose too much a problem outside, if it's cold it will just brush or blow off. Keep it sheltered, inside your coat or something, as much as possible while outside.

  4. #4
    Steve Muntz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    9
    I agree with FROM the cold - condensation, and the snow on it will melt. In that much wind whatever you use has to be pretty secure. A tight fitting plastic bag with gaffers tape holding it in place would probably work, but a few years ago I bought an inexpensive cover on ebay. It's like the Aquatech covers that sports shooters use but mine isn't that nice or waterproof. I've used it in pretty tough situations and the camera has stayed dry.

    Once you get inside and the camera has warmed up enough to take it out of the bag, leave it on a table overnight to make sure it really is dry before packing it away.

  5. #5
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    I was thinking about just that yesterday, Mike, as I was taking pics of our Montreal version of the snowstorm with the FE I just acquired from you! I am never terribly concerned over snow falling on the body, it's mostly the snow falling on the lens I care about. I use a lens hood, and point downward when I'm not shooting. Back home I let the camera warm up before opening it, and I give a quick wipe to the lens.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    258
    I'm not sure how weather-proof the old manual-focus cameras are, but with Canon's EOS 3 and 1V cameras they are really durable in light showers and snow if you pair them off with L series lenses. I normally just use the provided hoods for the lenses, and shoot as normal in light rain or snow. Sometimes if it's heavier rain, I use a filter too.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    I agree with others here - I don't think you really have to worry - once your camera gets cold, what little snow gets on it won't melt - just brush it off before going indoors. However, if you're still concerned, you could get a rain cover like this one:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...mouflage_.html
    I got one of these for my F100 when I had to shoot a football game in the rain.

    Dan
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  8. #8
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    I agree with others here - I don't think you really have to worry - once your camera gets cold, what little snow gets on it won't melt - just brush it off before going indoors. However, if you're still concerned, you could get a rain cover like this one:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...mouflage_.html
    I got one of these for my F100 when I had to shoot a football game in the rain.

    Dan
    Looks like a nice product but for the price I would just buy 10 cameras and use them as disposables.

    I would just keep the camera cold but covered and shield the lens from blowing snow. Likewise keep the film cold like the camera and be careful not to jam it in a warm pocket during film changes and allow condensation. Sometimes I use a gray card as an additional shield for the lens to reduce flare or keep mist/snow off the lens.

    Be careful about breathing condensation on the camera when focusing, which I would try to keep to a minimum. Wind the film slowly to try to prevent static from fogging the film. And do like the others suggest regarding a slow warmup from the cold, keeping the camera inside another bag until it is up to room temperature.
    Jerold Harter MD

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,595
    All great ideas!
    I just had a pm from a member that suggested a period of precooling before taking the camera into very cold conditions.It makes sense to chill the camera say in a front porch or a cool spot in the home ahead of time to prevent the initial cold blast from adding condensation to a lens or body.


    Mike

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    Looks like a nice product but for the price I would just buy 10 cameras and use them as disposables.

    I would just keep the camera cold but covered and shield the lens from blowing snow. Likewise keep the film cold like the camera and be careful not to jam it in a warm pocket during film changes and allow condensation. Sometimes I use a gray card as an additional shield for the lens to reduce flare or keep mist/snow off the lens.

    Be careful about breathing condensation on the camera when focusing, which I would try to keep to a minimum. Wind the film slowly to try to prevent static from fogging the film. And do like the others suggest regarding a slow warmup from the cold, keeping the camera inside another bag until it is up to room temperature.
    Whoops - you're right - the one I bought was only about $50
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin