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  1. #11
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Same as a Cartier-Bresson print. Trust me, you will not be looking at the grain.
    It's a "Pierre Gassman print," to be exact.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    It's a "Pierre Gassman print," to be exact.
    I know he didn't print his own work, but I don't think it matters since it's the quality of them that is relevant.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I know he didn't print his own work, but I don't think it matters since it's the quality of them that is relevant.

    - Thomas
    Well, no, it's not relevant to his qualities as an artist (unless somebody want to open that can of worms), but you know, Redde Caesari quae sunt Caesaris...
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  4. #14

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    Absolutely you can feel confident working in 35mm. Remember it's the picture itself - what it's saying, what it means, whether it works - that is the important thing - and...how long is piece of string? For something that goes with the grain, where the grain enhances the image, you can purposefully choose 35mm over larger format. Different film, different quality, different outcome. you can choose a fine grain image and print comfortably up to 12 x 16 and beyond (I comfortably print up to 16 x20, both 35mm and medium format - probably would go larger but this is the maximum size I can do easily in my darkroom). Enjoy and experiment, and don't feel you've got to be after something 'better'. You'll find the combinations of film format and film type and print size that appeal to you. There isn't 'better', only 'different'.

  5. #15

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    Lol. If you don't print and don't intend to print your own work then by the time you get to sizes that are on the margin of good quality from 35mm, you are talking very expensive for lab work. At much above 5x7 lab printing is expensive and would soon outweigh the expense of setting up a small darkroom.

    pentaxuser

  6. #16

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    Hi pentaxuser, I have the possibility of setting up a darkroom next year when my son moves into his flat. However, at the moment there is no real demand for my prints, probably because of their subject matter being non-commercial. If I did become in a position where people are prepared to pay for a print I just need to be confident that I can send the neg to a good printer and get a decent result. Being on limited income at the moment I don't know if I could afford to run a darkroom. reading some of the magazine articles such as in B&W they take loads of efforts to get where they want to be, and they're experts!

    Cheers, Lol

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbasierb View Post
    Paul Kozal uses a Nikon F-100 for some of his work.

    http://www.paulkozal.com/

    Jerry
    This guy does very, very nice work!

  8. #18
    Allan Swindles's Avatar
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    Lol, IMHO the biggest advantage of medium/large format is in the gradation, particularly noticable in monochrome work. I use OM Zuiko's for 35mm. transparency work with Fuji Velvia 50 which will produce well in magazines. For print work however, I would usually favour a larger format but the important thing is to get out there and shoot pictures, with whatever equipment you have. Only then will you be able to decide.
    I currently use Peak Imaging for the majority of my processing, on your doorstep (Sheffield).
    www.peak-imaging.com

    Regards - Allan.
    I'm into painting with light - NOT painting by numbers!

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lol999 View Post
    Being on limited income at the moment I don't know if I could afford to run a darkroom. reading some of the magazine articles such as in B&W they take loads of efforts to get where they want to be, and they're experts!

    With the camera on a tripod, slow, fine-grained film and good lenses it is perfectly possible to get a decent 16"x12" print from a 35mm negative – provided you can control the processing and printing. The guys writing in B&W magazine take a lot of trouble over their prints because that is often what is needed. If you are totally reliant on a lab for processing and printing you will be unlikely to realise the true quality of the images – and spend a helluva lot of money into the bargain.

    Save your pennies, hire a darkroom if you can, build your own if you can't, and meanwhile spend the money on film. That's my advice.


    Richard

  10. #20

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    We are risking you saying "We'll I knew that already" but at the risk of just such a retort, I'd say that relatively few buyers will want pics bigger than say 12x16 or at least not enough of them willing to pay the price for such prints. It sounds as if your aim is to cover the cost to benefit ratio of moving into MF and making pics is a business venture not a hobby which may on occasions produce an income. Bear in mind that few seem to make it as full time landscape photogs selling a range of their own pics.

    Some can do rather well as commission photogs ( usually weddings, portraiture or local newspaper contractors but the last one involves the dreaded d*****l) but I get the impression that this isn't your scene. Others get commissions from English Heritage or the National Trust like Joe Cornish and supplement income by running "photographic holidays". Maybe I belong the "glass half empty" group but I think that if the move to MF and the expense of so doing has to make a return on the investment I'd be in the pessimists group.

    If you feel you owe it to yourself to move up to MF because that realises your potential as a photog and you'll be unfulfilled unless you do then do it but if it's simply a "must have" return on cash investment which you can otherwise ill afford to spend without the guarantee of a return I'd be very wary about the committment.

    pentaxuser

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