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  1. #21
    Snapshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resummerfield View Post
    I have a Kenyon KS-6 kit and used it with a Pentax 67 for an aerial photography business I had in the late 90’s. Image stabilization lenses were just being introduced, and only a very few models, all 35mm. I needed a larger negative, so I used the P67.

    For air to ground shots, I used a 55-105mm zoom and could set the shutter speed fast, up to 1/1000. At that shutter speed the gyro wasn’t absolutely necessary, but it did make holding the camera and framing the scene much smoother. And maybe it did contribute somewhat to the very sharp results.

    For air to air shots, the gyro was indispensable. I primarily used a 200mm lens, but sometimes a 300mm lens, and the shutter speeds had to be 1/60 or maybe 1/125 to get the optimum propeller blur. The results were almost always tack sharp.
    Sounds like a great device. How much was your unit?
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snapshot View Post
    Sounds like a great device. How much was your unit?
    The kit, with battery, inverter, and a few connecting cords and adapters, was actually about the same price as the kits Kenyon is selling today-- $2,800. It paid for itself in the first few months of operation.
    —Eric

  3. #23

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    There are two methods currently used to implement IS. Both use accelerometers to sense up and down or side to side motion (the X and Y axes if the optical axis is taken as Z). For sensors in the lens, the optical path of the lens is moved. For sensors in the body, the sensor is moved (this method obviously doesn't work with film).

    In any case, IS is at best a gimmick. It doesn't sense rotation of any type, which is far more likely than just moving the camera up an down or side to side. It also senses movement that has already happened. So it just guesses at the correction needed based on the movement that occurred a fraction of a second earlier. It is more likely than not to guess wrong, and "automatically" blur an otherwise good shot.

    My Canon with IS consistently produces the blurriest pictures of any camera I have. It is especially bad if you are skilled at bracing yourself and smoothly pressing the shutter release.

  4. #24
    AgX
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    Tim, what do you mean by `bracing´?

  5. #25

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    mabman. Since my earlier post I happened by sheer luck to be speaking to a pro wedding photographer who now uses a F100 but in her early days used a pentax ME Super. Based on what she had to say it is not good news. She said that for even fairly modest zooms the ME's body was far too light and the lens unbalanced the camera. No such problems with a F100. I didn't ask but I suspect that in her line of work VR probably isn't needed a lot but I don't know. Anyway it seems that the ME's size and lightness may work against it.

    By the way and for what it is worth she went on to repeat what a number of others have said in the F5 v F100 thread. Namely that the F5 gave her nothing that the F100 didn't except muscle strain from its extra weight. So unless you are well muscled it may be that there is a happy medium in terms of camera body weight.

    pentaxuser

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by thuggins View Post
    In any case, IS is at best a gimmick. It doesn't sense rotation of any type, which is far more likely than just moving the camera up an down or side to side. It also senses movement that has already happened. So it just guesses at the correction needed based on the movement that occurred a fraction of a second earlier. It is more likely than not to guess wrong, and "automatically" blur an otherwise good shot.

    My Canon with IS consistently produces the blurriest pictures of any camera I have. It is especially bad if you are skilled at bracing yourself and smoothly pressing the shutter release.
    You must be using it incorrectly, or have faulty IS. I regularly use my 70-200 f2.8 IS at 1/25th - 1/50th and my 300 f4 IS at 1/60th sec and get sharp results without bracing. I'm not a very steady person, but the IS allows me to use FP4@125 where I would normally use HP5@400. This is about as un-gimmiky as you can get IMHO

    The IS will give blurry results if you pan the camera with it switched on (unless your canon IS lens has a 'mode 2').

    I'm not convinced it would be that useful on a shorter lens, but, after having it, I would not consider buying a telephoto lens without IS

  7. #27
    AgX
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    As this term has been used again, I still would like to know what `bracing´ means.

  8. #28
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    Bracing is a way of standing, you position your body to give maximum rigidity and stability. You can also brace your body when sitting or lying down. It's very useful when shooting

    Ian

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffHill View Post
    You must be using it incorrectly, or have faulty IS. I regularly use my 70-200 f2.8 IS at 1/25th - 1/50th and my 300 f4 IS at 1/60th sec and get sharp results without bracing. I'm not a very steady person, but the IS allows me to use FP4@125 where I would normally use HP5@400. This is about as un-gimmiky as you can get IMHO
    "I'm not a very steady person"... You just proved my point! If you know how to hold the camera and brace yourself for a shot IS will automatically blur a significant portion of your pictures. If memory serves, Nikon had to put in a mechanism to turn off the VR (their version of IS) when the camera is on a tripod. The VR was blurring pictures with the camera on a tripod!

    Ignorance isn't always bliss. It is worth doing a little reading to find out how a technology works, rather than just believing that it is magic.

  10. #30

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    VR and IS work incredibly well.

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