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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    If you check this link, http://www.canonfd.com/choose.htm you should be able to find more information on the Canon FD line of cameras. Some of the instruction manuals are available on pdf which can help you greatly. Also, be sure to check the links at the bottom of this page, as they are many and very useful too. I hope this helps you.

    Paul
    Last edited by pauliej; 06-29-2008 at 11:02 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12

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    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    You don't need a guide for these cameras! You have exactly four main things to consider, just like any camera: Film speed, focus, shutter speed, and aperture. The camera is 100% self explanatory. That is the beauty of it: A monkey could use it. The camera has a film speed selector, a shutter speed selector, an aperture selector, and a focusing collar. It also has a shutter release button. Plus a combined timer/D of F/MLU, a meter/battery check switch, an advance lever, a rewind switch, and a rewind knob. It has a film door. It has a flash synch. It has a removable prism. That's already way more than you need to know to get good pix with it.

    It's automatic/electronic cameras for which you really need the manual! If you can't figure it out by fiddling with it for a bit, I bet you can find the manual online.
    I have managed to figure out what buttons and knobs control what by just playing with it, and have some knowledge of the various settings(have some experience with DSLRs), but if I was to use it without battery (and so without aid of the meter), how do I take a good picture? Or am I wondering about the impossible?

  3. #13

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    Apr 2008
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    All the battery does is feed the meter. Everything else is exactly the same. Photography was practiced for about 100 years before meters became commonplace, so they just experimented at first, which is what you would need to do as well. This experimentation led to the development of neat little guides like Basic Daylight Exposure (BDE), AKA the "sunny 16" guide. This gives you a starting point for meterless exposure by stating: when film speed equals shutter speed, and you are in clear and bright conditions, use f/16. Adjustments are made for different lighting conditions by always referring back to this guide. For instance, in open shade on a clear bright day, increase exposure from BDE by 8x to 16x. I will look for my chart somewhere...but I am not so sure I can find it.

    However, everywhere in the world is different, and every camera's shutter is a bit different, as are developing and printing parameters, etc. You will have to use BDE as a starting guide only, and find your own way.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    All the battery does is feed the meter. Everything else is exactly the same. Photography was practiced for about 100 years before meters became commonplace, so they just experimented at first, which is what you would need to do as well. This experimentation led to the development of neat little guides like Basic Daylight Exposure (BDE), AKA the "sunny 16" guide. This gives you a starting point for meterless exposure by stating: when film speed equals shutter speed, and you are in clear and bright conditions, use f/16. Adjustments are made for different lighting conditions by always referring back to this guide. For instance, in open shade on a clear bright day, increase exposure from BDE by 8x to 16x. I will look for my chart somewhere...but I am not so sure I can find it.

    However, everywhere in the world is different, and every camera's shutter is a bit different, as are developing and printing parameters, etc. You will have to use BDE as a starting guide only, and find your own way.
    Thanks! A starting point like this was exactly what I was looking for.

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