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  1. #1

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    Canon EOS 3 problem - any ideas?

    Hi

    I bought a secondhand Canon EOS 3 which the previous owner said was in perfect working order. Everything seemed fine but half way through the first roll the shutter seemed to jam. After a while it worked again, but then the autofocus seemed not to work properly, and the viewfinder seemed dim. It couldn't find focus or got the wrong focus. After a while I rewound the roll and fired the shutter a lot and this seemed to cure it.

    Does anyone know what is likely to have caused this and if it will happen again? Thanks

    Ritchie
    Last edited by thomsonrc; 06-29-2008 at 05:27 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typos

  2. #2
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Were you changing lenses while this was happening? Some off brand lenses will cause lockups, otherwise the contacts on the lens or the camera may have oxidised while sitting on the shelf.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #3

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    Does this camera have motor drive? Also could be battery failure, dirty contacts. I own a EOS3 that is rarely used and will act like what you described from storing the camera for long peroids of time with the batteries in it. Usually a good cleaning resolves the issue.. Just a thought if you have not considered this yet...Good luck Mark

  4. #4

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    Gary - I wasnt changing lenses, so I dont think it was that.

    Mark - You could be right the previous owner had not used it for a year or so, I'll try cleaning the contacts and battery

    thanks.

    Ritchie

  5. #5

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    I too own an EOS-3 and it has the occasional quirk. I think in mine the AF point wouldn't center with this one lens. Sadly, these cameras are electronic so they can both go bad and be uneconomical to repair. I haven't used my EOS gear very much because I've been loving my FD gear lately, but I probably will this weekend. Maybe I'll do a EOS-3 and Reala versus my 5D comparison.

    One thing I have noticed is that if you're using an M42 adapter, be careful. Some lenses will protrude into the mirror box just enough to catch the mirror on the way up or down, especially when focused at infinity. I had that happen twice before I realized what was going on. Non-Canon lenses can also cause problems. Usually those show up as EEE messages though. My guess would be batteries or battery contacts as Mark suggests.

    Please let us know?
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    The EOS 3 has been bedevilled with quirks (and in sometimes, major faults), both major and minor, since it was released, and many owners silently put up with quirks such as the oft-reported "sticky-shutter button" syndrome. I am suspicious of the motives of people selling capable workhorse cameras like the generally very good EOS 3 and saying they work "perfectly" but can provide no factual proof. If you're serious about photography, you'd buy from an established pro dealer where the history of the equipment can be looked at; I have done that for all of my EOS bodies. Active cameras should be bench-inspected by technicians once every 12 months (or 3 years if used very little). A flashing warning signal, such as "BC" or "EEEE" on many EOS cameras, particularly the EOS 1N, RS, 5, 50E et al, is a sure sign of trouble which can range from poor battery contacts (a problem with some models using 2CR5 and other batteries) or bent/sticky AF contacts in the mirror box. And lastly, never ever mothball cameras with batteries in them: all out! Periodically fire the shutter a few times at various speeds with a lens in place during long spells from action, and store in a cool and dry area. Fungus growing on internal circuits over time, exposure to coastal areas then very moist/humid environments are also precursors to serious trouble (I have seen an EOS 5 that refused to fire because of fungal growths). Have the camera professionally checked out.

    .:: GRH ::.
    Moderator, Canon EOS1N-series message board, KL (AU)
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 07-01-2008 at 09:38 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo; re-worded sentence
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  7. #7
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    Well, there go my thoughts of getting an EOS 3 to try.
    Charles Hohenstein

  8. #8
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Hmmm. I've never had a problem with my EOS 3 or my Elan II. I guess I must just be in denial... :rolleyes:
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    If you're serious about photography, you'd buy from an established pro dealer where the history of the equipment can be looked at; I have done that for all of my EOS bodies. Active cameras should be bench-inspected by technicians once every 12 months (or 3 years if used very little). Have the camera professionally checked out.

    .:: GRH ::.
    Moderator, Canon EOS1N-series message board, KL (AU)
    Well I only bought it to make some pictures of my son (aged 18 months) as he runs around, as I've never tried autofocus before. So maybe I'm not serious about photography. That said I do have medium format equipment which I bought from dealers which I use for 'serious' photography.


    When it did work I couldnt really get the hang of it anyway, too many buttons and functions for someone brought up on the Nikon FM2, Mamiya 6 and Fuji GW69II. Wish I'd never bought it.

    Ritchie

  10. #10
    ath
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomsonrc View Post
    When it did work I couldnt really get the hang of it anyway, too many buttons and functions for someone brought up on the Nikon FM2, Mamiya 6 and Fuji GW69II. Wish I'd never bought it.
    Well in this case I recommend to sell the EOS3 and buy a FM2. There's no sense in using equipment someone dislikes except one is forced to.

    The EOS3 has really much options but can be used in a very basic way: set it to M and your preferred metering pattern; and after switching it on you only have to adjust time and aperture, focus and release. Just like a FM2 - even with manual focus if you change the screen.
    The EOS3 gives you choice - the FM2 not. Some people like this, others not.

    My EOS3 operates like a charm, except the occasional scratch in the film from dust.

    P.S.: Lithium batterys are sometimes a bit strange. I've had a few from a big brand (i.e. someone, who really manufactures them) developing a high internal resistance. They can even get a bit lazy when not in use. Clean the contacts, use the battery and in doubt get a new (good) one.
    Last edited by ath; 07-02-2008 at 10:18 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added P.S.
    Regards,
    Andreas

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