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  1. #11

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    Ye olde trick of the trade for fungus. Place the lens on a flat surface, get an angle-lamp and lower the bulb to about 6" above the lens. Switch on the angle-lamp and cook the lens for a few hours which will kill off the fungus. Just keep an eye on it to make sure nothing catches fire. Usual disclaimers with this post but we use to use it in a photographic store I errrrm worked at

  2. #12
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    couldn't you send a lens to someone like SK Grimes and have them take it apart and clean it out of all the fungus? That is if it were worth the cost of the cleaning?

  3. #13

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    Quicker and cheaper to buy a replacement lens. You should be able to get a replacement for $10 - $20.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  4. #14

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    Voigtlander Cosina makes some new M42 mount lenses. Check out http://www.cameraquest.com to check them out. Follow the SLR lens link(s).

  5. #15
    gma
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    TPPhotog,

    I am glad you mentioned the lamp idea. I have thought that a good "cooking" might be able to at least arrest fungus if not eliminate the traces from the interior lens surfaces. I have sucessfully eliminated minor moisture from wrist watches using a regular light bulb for 30 minutes or so.

    What exactly did this accomplish? Did you use a regular light bulb or infrared heat lamp?
    Last edited by gma; 08-25-2004 at 12:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    gma,

    We use to use a standard 60 watt bulb and cook for as long as it took for the lens to clear. Be very careful when you touch the lens though as it does get very very hot. It may sound a little scary to some people but quite a few lens are treated this way before they are sold on the re-used/secondhand market. Although the store I was at sold equipment with up to a 6 month warrenty, we never had any returns so I'm guessing it is a virtually permanant fix. I've treated a lens I got for my Zenith cheap on a market the same way and at least 2 years later it still has no sign of the dreaded fungus returning.

  7. #17
    gma
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    Thanks for the additional information. I meant to ask if you used ultraviolet -not infrared. Regular 60 watt sounds even better. I will try it tonight.


    Currently I am cooking a Carl Zeiss pre-WWII Tessar lens ( all metal and glass- no plastic or rubber ) that has an overall haze that I have never liked. I will report back after it has been cooked 2" from a 60 watt bulb for ten hours.


    I was a bit sceptical, but this really made a difference in my 65 year old uncoated lens. It is clearer than before the cooking. I will cook another 10 hours tonight.
    Last edited by gma; 08-26-2004 at 06:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by gma
    I was a bit sceptical, but this really made a difference in my 65 year old uncoated lens. It is clearer than before the cooking. I will cook another 10 hours tonight.
    So this is a recognised procedure?
    Any problems with multi-coated lenses?

    I have just acquired a Vivitar 70-210 series 1 zoom, which appears to have fungus on the inside of the very first element when viewed at certain angles. Otherwise it looks OK (see below)

    If it works, this procedure sounds interesting, but I am a bit concerned about damaging the lens.

    Any opinions?

    Cheers,
    Nick


  9. #19

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    Have you taken a look on www.KEH.COM yet? they have all sorts of lenses and bodies from the 60s n 70s still in great condition. I just looked and your lens is about $50.

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