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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    This is incidentally the difference between the old knob wind Linhof Rollex rollfilm backs and the later Super-Rollex backs with the advance lever. The older backs turned the takeup spool a constant amount for each frame, so frame spacing would increase. Unfortunately, they also assumed a certain film and paper backing thickness, so with thinner modern 120 films, they often produce overlapping frames. The later Super-Rollex back actually meters the film travel with the large rubber roller, so that it never has frame spacing problems.

    The Voigtlander Superb TLR from the 1930s didn't have an auto-stop film advance, but it did have a ratcheting lever and a feeler wheel to measure the amount of film travel and transfer that information to a frame counting cylinder.
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  2. #12
    kodachrome64's Avatar
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    Why is it that such a "modern" camera as my F100 can't space all frames evenly? I've never been able to understand why 35mm cameras can't advance a set number of sprocket holes (at least the ones I've had).
    Kodachrome
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  3. #13
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Some cameras can advance very precisely. For example the konica hexar AF. I recall that one could remove film half roll and switch rolls and then later come back to where you were.... without missing any frames. So the technology exists...
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #14
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Some cameras just have better registration than others. If the frame spacing drifts back and forth, then it's a registration issue. If the frame spacing gets progressively larger, then the camera isn't metering the actual film travel.
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  5. #15
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Some cameras can advance very precisely. For example the konica hexar AF. I recall that one could remove film half roll and switch rolls and then later come back to where you were.... without missing any frames. So the technology exists...
    This is true with perhaps most 35mm cameras if one always carefully starts the film in the same position and with the shutter ready to shoot so the film advance mechanism is uniformly positioned. Being a klutz, I usually sacrifice a blank frame to allow for operator error.

  6. #16
    Akki14's Avatar
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    On my finetta 88 camera it doesn't count sprocket holes and the spacing varies from nearly nonexistant at the beginning of the roll to about 2-3 times wider than average spacing towards the end but I still get the right number of exposures from the roll of film so it doesn't bother me.

    However, it ticks off lab techs to no end. I had a 1hr photo place here whinge at me for not letting them cut apart my negatives and it was a roll unevenly spaced and for some reason their lab tech had to do everything very slowly which took approximately 6 hours. I didn't get any refund for the hassle either.
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  7. #17

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    Because the takeup spool turns on a slipping clutch. As the effective diameter of the spool increases, it has to turn less. The sprocket pulls film through at a fixed amount, but the takeup spool compensates for it's own change in diameter. Not doing so would pull too much film and rip sprockets. I saw this once in an OM-1 I was repairing. The customer had poured epoxy in through the spool slots so it wouldn't slip anymore......ha ha. Kohn, www.zuiko.com

  8. #18
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    You people have WAAAY too much time on your hands.

    Michael Sebastian
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  9. #19

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    Happy to help. Also, if the OM (1 thru 2N) takeup clutch wears out, the spool won't takeup enough, film bunches up in the chamber, has nowhere to go, then frames start top overlap (and the wind action itself feels kind weird while this is going on). John, www.zuiko.com

  10. #20
    Poohblah's Avatar
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    gotcha. thanks guys.

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