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  1. #1
    digiconvert's Avatar
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    On camera vs off camera metering

    Finishing a roll of film the other day I thought I'd check on camera metering (reflected) vs my Minolta III with the diffuser cone on a distant subject. The results are attached. The left hand image is from the camera metering. I must admit to being amazed at how under exposed the Cathedral is on the camera metered shot , the EOS 30 is usually pretty good.
    For info both are neg scans from Portra 160NC and the only PS work is to set the white point on both using the edge of one of the clouds and mid grey on a roof I know to be about the right tone plus a little unsharp mask.

    Comments more than welcome.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails camera.jpg   minolta.jpg  
    Hmm- Wonder if she'd notice if I bought that :)

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    Akki14's Avatar
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    Looks like your camera was metering the sky and you did incidence metering which is suppose to be more accurate and less likely to be fooled in these situations.
    ~Heather
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    http://www.stargazy.org/

  3. #3
    digiconvert's Avatar
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    Yes but it reinforces the need for meters even in this digi world.
    Hmm- Wonder if she'd notice if I bought that :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by digiconvert View Post
    Finishing a roll of film the other day I thought I'd check on camera metering (reflected) vs my Minolta III with the diffuser cone on a distant subject. The results are attached. The left hand image is from the camera metering. I must admit to being amazed at how under exposed the Cathedral is on the camera metered shot , the EOS 30 is usually pretty good.
    For info both are neg scans from Portra 160NC and the only PS work is to set the white point on both using the edge of one of the clouds and mid grey on a roof I know to be about the right tone plus a little unsharp mask.

    Comments more than welcome.
    Yep agree with the other guy, the white sky fooled the camera (blue sky less)......my Konica TC has a good idea with tricky light situations (well it was an original idea about 30 years ago)..........half press the shutter button down and point the camera at some grass or anything light grey (equivalent to incident or roughly kodak grey card)........ it's called exposure "Memory" lock.......it will hold that exposure after re-composing and finally pressing the shutter button all the way to take the shot with the correct exposure.

    In the past I used to point the exposure meter (weston) at the back of my sun tanned hand or again grass or grey pavement, and set the camera to those readings.

  5. #5

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    Take any handheld (off camera) meter in reflected metering position, aim it toward any normally bright object and include in scene lots of backlighting (or sky as in your example) and it will give same underexposed result. It is not that your on camera meter is bad, it is lots if backlighting which fools any meter.
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
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  6. #6
    eddym's Avatar
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    So where did you meter? This looks more like operator error than meter error to me. Always remember two things:
    The camera has no idea what you are taking a picture of;
    and every meter thinks the world is gray.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by digiconvert View Post
    Yes but it reinforces the need for meters even in this digi world.
    Nah! in the digi world you just guess the exposure then check your result on the LCD, make adjustment then shoot again. I don't use either the built in nor hand held meter with my digital camera and I always shoot in manual mode. I get to the point where my first guess is generall quite good. I know the respond of my little digi cam well enough that I use it as the meter for my film camera. Well I gota shoot film or else I am not supposed to be here right?

  8. #8
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Apparently, the metering was influenced by the "Angle of Acceptance". The in-camera meter "read" the amount of light received (reflected) from the entire frame, and responded with an "average" value, including a lot of light from the sky.
    The Minolta III (I'm NOT familiar with this meter) read a smaller portion of the frame (center) and was less influenced by the light from the sky.

    One question (see "not familiar" preceding) ... Is the operation of this meter with the "diffuser cone" the proper way to go for
    reflected metering? Diffusers (usually spherical) are proper in incident metering.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #9
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach View Post
    The Minolta III (I'm NOT familiar with this meter) read a smaller portion of the frame (center) and was less influenced by the light from the sky.
    The Minolta Autometer III is an incident meter. The diffuser would be more properly described as a dome, or hemisphere, typical of incident meters.

    Lee

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    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    The Minolta Autometer III is an incident meter. The diffuser would be more properly described as a dome, or hemisphere, typical of incident meters.
    If that is the case, the amount of light reflected from the scene may easily be different from the light reaching the meter from another source (incident).
    Incident metering is taken AT the subject; reflective metering, AT the camera.

    Reflective metering is affected by the nature of the subject (dark will send less light to the meter than light); incident is not - measuring the amount of light falling on the subject.

    I would use nothing other than "incident" in studio work (give me a 2% 'worm-out' window here). In landscape work, it would be very difficult to take a meter reading AT the subject, and travel to the camera without having the amount of light falling on the subject (scene) change.
    i
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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