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  1. #31

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    i have a 27 year old pentax k1000,
    my first 35mm camera ... new it was 120$ with
    a 50mm f2 lens. it not a high end body.
    it works as any other 35mm camera i have ( i think i have 2 others )

    worry about seeing, and your glass
    i wouldn't worry too much about the body ...
    unless, of course, you have a camera body fetish.
    in that case, enjoy!

  2. #32
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Well then I guess I have a camera body fetish

    I simply find certain things much easier to accomplish with different gear. When I am in the "camera is just a box" mode then I use LF. Refreshing, but not something I want to do all the time.

    I'll just conclude by saying that I don't think that appreciation of gear and photographic vision are mutually exclusive! I am a certifiable gearnut. Avid reader of MTF charts. Measurbator. Whatever you wanna call it. So what, I have no vision? I think I have some modicum of vision. It's not like I keep my gear in velvet boxes.

    I enjoy adapting gear to the purpose at hand, and thereby trying new things. I do not enjoy p&s style fully-automated photography, and too often people make the assumption that if you are a gearhead like me then you necessarily like full automation. Not at all. I simply like whatever gets the shots that I want for the least expense and least fuss. Whether that's a cambo 8x10 or my 2mp blackberry camera phone, I just don't care.

    The danger of being me is that the gear starts to fill your house. I now have two rooms that are completely unnavigable because of 25 camera outfits and such. I know that I should sell some stuff but I really appreciate the designs of these things and it'd be like selling children. What cameras I have sold I now miss terribly! Oh well.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #33
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Absolutely a camera body makes a difference to image quality.

    I find I get vastly superior images when using a camera body which holds film.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Let's see.

    There's measurements to start with:
    The film gate needs to sit at the correct distance from the lens, within a few hundredths of a mm.
    The lens mount and the film plane need to be absolutely parallel.
    The lens to film distance needs to be exactly the same as the lens to focussing screen distance.
    The film gate and focussing screen need to be aligned laterally.

    Then there are the moving bits:
    The mirror needs to return into the exact position (within those hundredths of a mm again) every single time it moves up and down again.
    The shutter must work, be precise, and not bounce.
    Diaphragm, mirror, and shutter need to be synchronized properly.
    Film transport must be regular (frame spacing) and smooth (mechanical damage to the film).
    The film (also a moving bit) must be put and kept in the same position exactly, again and again.
    And the electronic or mechanical thingy (depending on the particular camera) that will be timing the exposure must work, and keep working.

    You will want to see a large, bright and easy to focus viewfinder image too. So the optics of the viewing system must be up to scratch too.
    Particularly important if the metering electronics also use the viewfinder optics.

    I will have forgotten one or two things. And more can be said about the things i have mentioned.

    But apart from that, no, a camera has very little effect on the quality of the images it produces...
    Believe that, and you'll believe anything.
    Yep, there's an awful lot to making a camera work properly. However, as most manufacturers do a good job making their consumer models (Nikon F65, F75 etc...) the main differences between those cameras and the F5 and F6, as far as the image is concerned, is the photographer holding it rather than the camera itself.

    There are lots of examples that demonstrate that a pinhole camera in the right hands can produce better images than the most expensive professional kit being used by someone less gifted / experienced.

    Paul
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete H View Post
    Everyone seems to be discussing technicalities here. What about ergonomics, feel, what you are comfortable with?
    I would have to agree, the easier the camera is to handle in YOUR hands the more you will want to use it.....

    But I must also say, about 18 years ago I had a customer at the camera store, where I ran the photo lab, do some testing on some of the high end Canon auto focus SLR cameras. His complaint was that even when working on a tripod the mirror slap actually shook the camera enough to make the image soft..... enough for him to not buy it, actually her returned it..... sure wish I could remember which camera it was...... but then again he was comparing it to images shot with his R series Leica, which he had to do to eliminate my enlarger lens......

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jenkin View Post

    There are lots of examples that demonstrate that a pinhole camera in the right hands can produce better images than the most expensive professional kit being used by someone less gifted / experienced.

    Paul
    As I always told students, know the limitations of your equipment and work within them. I have taken many a good photo with a disposable camera......

  7. #37

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    Thanks to all who replied... It's appreciated. I still would like the 1N, something about the plastic film guides/rails in the 7E that bug the heck out of me. I'm probably crazy and that's fine, as I don't think that matters much.

  8. #38
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    Yes if the metering is bad or if there's any problem with essential parts (shutter, speed settings, compensation).
    It's the lens that matters. You have a great lens then you may take sharp pictures with lots of detail.

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