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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jenkin View Post
    (b) I like the idea of a camera that works mechanically if the batteries die - though does it work on all shutter speeds? The chap in the shop actually mentioned this and suggested it was only from 1/125 towards the faster shutter speeds.
    In AE mode the LX speeds are all electronically controlled. In manual mode, the speeds from X (1/75) to 1/2000 are mechanical. This is helpful as a backup, though I find 1/75 a bit constraining as the slow limit, because I do a lot of available-light shooting on 35mm and most of the time find myself in the 1/15-1/60 range. Anyway, carrying a spare pair of S76's is not a big deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jenkin View Post
    The only consideration is the sports finder. As a spectacles user, this gives a great view but is it possible to get hold of the standard prism as a separate purchase? Are there any advantages or drawbacks in having only the sports finder?
    The sports finder is a tool for solving special problems. For most purposes, the LX is much more pleasant to use with one of the standard eye-level prisms. Yes, you can find them as separate items. The standard is the FA-1; the FA-1W offers a broader range of diopter adjustment. The FA-2 lacks a hot shoe.

    As you might guess, I have a pair of LX bodies which I've had for 20+ years. I love the camera body - for my taste, its size, weight and feel in the hand are ideal - I've handled almost every film SLR of the last 30 years, and it's my favorite of all.

    But like any camera, it's not without its quirks. The shutter/mirror action is loud, though in return you get a very short shutter lag for an SLR, and the mirror action is actually very well damped on the upswing, so hand-holdability at slow shutter speeds is still good. There's no AE lock, only an exposure compensation dial. (But I use mine almost exclusively in manual mode.)

    At the risk of opening a can of worms, I don't like the Pentax lenses as much as I did when I first used them 30 years ago. With time and experience one gains a broader perspective, and I've since been spoiled by M-Leica glass, and by large format Rodenstock and Schneider lenses. By those standards, the Pentax lenses as a group tend to be harsh and unrefined. Yes, there's some variation among individual types, and the newer 31/43/77 Limited series in particular are in a different league. I don't think I'd be any happier with the Canon FD glass, though, and for sure I much prefer the LX body to either the old or new F-1 bodies.

    Anyway, just my $0.02. We all have our own tastes, YMMV, etc.
    Last edited by Oren Grad; 12-13-2008 at 03:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32

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    Decision made...........

    I was just having a browse through the 'big auction site' (like you do) when I stumbled across a black-bodied (my preference) Olympus OM2n complete with a 50mm f1.4 and hot-shoe (without the usual crack!) all in Ex++ condition and for a very modest sum on a 'Buy It Now' deal. My missus decided that this could be her Crimble present to me.

    So, assuming that it arrives as good as it looks, this is the start of my little 'modern classic' collection. I suppose the next question will be whether to go for 24mm, 28mm or 35mm wide angle and what portrait lens? (I have no real use for anything longer than 100mm and I'm not a Zuiko zoom fan as I've owned the 35-70mm f3.5/4.5 and 75-150mm in the 80's and wasn't overly impressed).

    I currently fancy the 28mm/f2.8 and the 85mm/f2 but would be glad of any advice on whether there are any better / more versatile options for landscapes and portraits.

    Thanks to all of the comments / suggestions so far and I fully expect to have a Canon F1/F1n and a Pentax LX before 2010 arrives...
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  3. #33

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    Well I'm pleased with the Sigma 24mm f2.8 superwide II that I got off ebay for £8.......scanned from a 5X7" print:-


  4. #34
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jenkin View Post
    Decision made...........

    I was just having a browse through the 'big auction site' (like you do) when I stumbled across a black-bodied (my preference) Olympus OM2n complete with a 50mm f1.4 and hot-shoe (without the usual crack!) all in Ex++ condition and for a very modest sum on a 'Buy It Now' deal. My missus decided that this could be her Crimble present to me.

    So, assuming that it arrives as good as it looks, this is the start of my little 'modern classic' collection. I suppose the next question will be whether to go for 24mm, 28mm or 35mm wide angle and what portrait lens? (I have no real use for anything longer than 100mm and I'm not a Zuiko zoom fan as I've owned the 35-70mm f3.5/4.5 and 75-150mm in the 80's and wasn't overly impressed).

    I currently fancy the 28mm/f2.8 and the 85mm/f2 but would be glad of any advice on whether there are any better / more versatile options for landscapes and portraits.

    Thanks to all of the comments / suggestions so far and I fully expect to have a Canon F1/F1n and a Pentax LX before 2010 arrives...
    The Olympus zooms you mention were early 1980's designs: 25+ yrs ago, and yeah they're not as good as modern zooms. The single focal length Zuikos rival modern lenses, and in some cases eclipse them. The 28/2.8 Zuiko and 24/2.8 Zuiko are extremely sharp. Both are better than the modern AF-Nikkors that I have for my Nikon digital cameras. (I've also shot the Nikkors on film and the Zuikos are still better). Olympus made several versions of the 50/1.4 All are decent but the ones with a serial number over 1,100,000 are considerably better than the more common ones in the lower ranges. I've used one of the >1,100,000 50's and one with a serial in the 700,000 range. The 85/2 Zuiko was made in several versions. I have the last one and it is sharp but hasn't got as nice of Bokeh as the earlier ones. Considering the extreme price these lenses go for (Typically over $300 on ebay) I'd go for the 100/2.8 instead for portraits. It is sharper and has better Bokeh in my opinion, and typically costs less than $100 for a good one on ebay.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

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  5. #35
    Ken N's Avatar
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    I just came into possession of a Zuiko 35-80 F2.8 zoom lens. This lens you can stack up against the best lens of any system today. It is an exceptional hunka-chunka-glass. Heavy as a brick, though.

    I love using my old classic Zuiko lenses. My kit currently contains the 24/2.8, 35/2.8, 35/shift, 50/3.5, 35-80, 100/2.8, 200/4 and 300/4.5. All of them give my images a distinct look--one which I use for my professional photography.

    A favorite lens? Hands down, it's an older, mid-life design of the Zuiko 100/2.8. This is my "money lens".
    http://www.zone-10.com

    When you turn your camera on, does it return the favor?

  6. #36
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    Ken N gives good advice. We have shot together in the past. Don't worry about the OM being too small for a big person with large hands. That would be a good description of either of us. I like his kit and mine defers a little. My preference is toward the 85mm f2. If you are inclined toward macro, you might look at working a Tamron SP 90mm f2.5 lens in the middle. If you are collecting and using, you might also look at several of the Tamron SP lenses which can be used on most 35mm SLR cameras with the proper adapter. My 300mm is the Tamron 300mm f2.8 and I use a 180mm f2.5 Tamron. Bill Barber

  7. #37

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    I have a Canon F-1 and a Ftb and been using them for several years. Both are very reliable and rugged. The FD lens are great!

    Jeff

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur2 View Post
    Well I'm pleased with the Sigma 24mm f2.8 superwide II that I got off ebay for £8.......scanned from a 5X7" print:-

    Nice image for an £8 lens! Would that I could have been so lucky. Anyway, I trawled the net and found a nice example of the Zuiko 24mm/f2.8 for £50 - which I thought was pretty reasonable, given that the price range seemed to strech up to about £125 for a truly mint and boxed example.

    Hopefully, I should have the OM2n + 50mm/f1.4 + 28mm/f2.8 this weekend, so I'll be able to go and take some shots whilst the winter solstice is upon us.

    All the best. Paul.
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  9. #39

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    Thanks Chris, Ken and Bill.

    As you might have seen, I've now got my hands on a Zuiko 24mm/f2.8. I don't think I'll feel the need to go for the shift lens as I'm not really into interiors and I actually like a bit of converging verticals when it comes to buildings. Weird, eh?

    I will probably go for the Zuiko 100mm/f2.8 as the 80mm/f2 is at least twice the price without, from what I can gather, being twice the lens. The extra stop isn't likely to cause me any grief. Many moons ago, I owned one of the Tamron lenses Bill mentioned, with an 'Adaptall II' converter. Nice piece of kit but I don't do much macro these days and, if I do, I have the latest version of the lens to fit my Nikon D300. Heresy, I know, but the results are superb - even for digital....!

    My Oly gear should keep me amused for some time to come. Thanks ever so much to everyone for all their advice and input. I'm sure I'll be on the acquisition trail again in 2009.......
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

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