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  1. #1

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    Nikon F5 vs. Canon Eos 1n

    I'm sorry if this has been posted before, I couldn't find a similar thread with the search engine.

    I want to get into auto focus film SLRs, and I have two cameras in mind. Both the F5 and the 1n seem to have quite a large fan base, but I've never used either, so I'm confused. Can anyone tell me something about each model's advantages over the other? Are there any killer features that I might benefit from?

    Some info on my photography, if it helps: I like shooting Portraits and I want to do a lot of low light stuff. I want a camera that is very easy to use and has a very wide range of shutter speeds (give me that half minute exposure!), and an advanced metering chip would be nice as well.

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    Ken N's Avatar
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    Both are actually extremely good cameras and part of exceptional systems. Pick one based on other factors like how it feels in your hand or the availability of the lenses you want to use. Seriously, you can't go wrong with either one as they both are top dogs.
    http://www.zone-10.com

    When you turn your camera on, does it return the favor?

  3. #3
    ron110n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funkpilz View Post
    I want to do a lot of low light stuff.
    Thanks for any help!
    I have a Nikon F5, but I think low light stuff like night club utilizing available light belong to the Rangefinder world that don't have a mirror that slap. It can be done with an SLR and why not. But you will have to push your ISO or use a monopod. The Nikkor VR AF (Vibration Reduction) lenses... I believe that belongs to the digital world, cause I don't see any advantage on film. Plus you have no control and tons of f stop limitations on VR lenses. Once the lens CPU says no to your SLR body, your F5 "won't shoot". I learned that the hard way by owning one. But works well on my D300.

  4. #4
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    What optics do you have?

    If Nikkors go for the F5, if you own Canons, shoot on the 1N, simple.



    Cheers



    André

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    The flagship of the EOS fleet and replacement for the blighty EOS 1, the much more refined EOS 1N was introduced in 1994 and discontinued in September 2001, quickly finding a solid favouring by the press and documentary photographers for its speed and robustness.

    The 1N's rounded profile and sealed push button controls (with early optional heavy-duty weatherproofing over-seals) was favoured by photojournalists and even bushwalkers/mountaineers working in extreme environments. Photographers with small hands found the EOS 1N without the power drive booster E1 (8x AA batteries) fitted delightfully to hand, making it terrific for streetwise photography. It has the option of using a 2CR5 battery or for high levels of sustained speed and power the optional power drive booster [PDBE-1] — the fixed-mirror 1N RS has this booster permanently attached which gives that model a thumping 10 frames per second top speed, letting you burn a roll of 'Vaudeville Velvia' in about 3 seconds). Many analogists (myself among) power the PDBE1 with lithium batteries. I've shot 340 rolls and the batteries are still in there.

    The 1N in good to very good condition can be bought for around AUD$500 body only, or about $700 with PDBE1: you do need to watch how older cameras have been treated. I bought mine off eBay after probity checks and scrutinising the seller thoroughly about condition. Of course, the 1N can withstand quite a banging in active service, but after so long, quite a few of the bodies would be showing heavy wear. Bent internal electronic contacts, damaged top panel display or scratched lengs and even marked mirrors are a common symptom of heavy pro use, ordinarily knocked about willy-nilly in bags, back seats and backpacks without body caps. The interchangeable Command Back E1 with intervalometer, frame numbering etc. is quite rare now.

    The longer I've owned my bodies the more appreciative I have become for easily coping with heat, cold dust, dirt and the plain curious (i.e. the Customs Officer who wanted the lens removed to check if narcotics were stashed under the mirror!! ),

    The 1N does have ideosyncracies. The "two-fingered hokey-pokey" for setting custom functions in a side 'trapdoor' is a bit tedious when you're in a hurry or working in the dark and require a thorough familiarisation to ensure you don't inadvertently set the self-timer up for 2 seconds when you're about to photograph bub seeing the first light of day! Minor quibbles aside I'd buy another to join the two I already have, if only I could justify the weight!

    Some other curious facts:
    • The 1N consumes virtually no power over extended Bulb exposures
    • 2CR5 batteries last much longer in the 1N than, for instance, the EOS 5
    • Being a system camera, otherwise awkward EOS lenses such as the sharp-edged TS-E PC lenses,
    will not damage the body like they can on the EOS 5 and other models.
    • Power Drive Boosters with the AEL button marked with an asterisk ( * ) can use lithium batteries. Those not so marked will be damaged.

    At the end of the day, you'll probably form a noticeably definite affinity with one system over another by interchanging the systems frequently — even if that means buying into and out of a system, until you settle with one you really, really like (this is what I did, from 1979 to 1992 when I finally settled on Canon, having worked through Olympus, Pentax, Minolta, Nikon and finally... ).

    I will not say "don't consider anything else". The era of these beautiful flagship cameras from all marques has been consigned to a niche in history. Nikon's F4, F5 ... maybe even the F90x are also worth evaluating. For me, the F401 in 1991 didn't go down well at all.

    More info on EOS 1N: http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography.../eos/index.htm
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 12-12-2008 at 06:12 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: reversed wording
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #6
    wildbill's Avatar
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    I bought an eos-1n just because I liked the sound of shutter/film advance. I also wanted to switch to canon lenses. The 1n is more compact and may be lighter.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  7. #7

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    I prefer the Nikon F100, after having owned 2 F5 bodies. The F100 is far lighter in weight. I have three.

    The Canon system is just as fine. If you have previous experience with the Canon system, I say stay with it.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    [...] The Canon system is just as fine. If you have previous experience with the Canon system, I say stay with it.

    Agreed.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #9
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    I think the F5 compares to the EOS 1V; it is beyond the 1 N.

    However, for all normal purposes the F100 is the standard: it does all anyone is likely to need,
    with no extra cost or size to do the things you won't need. Maybe it would compare more to the 1 N.

    The F100 focusses manual lenses very well, something the F5 & the 1v do not --- without replacing the standard screen, which is easy.

    I use an EOS 1v, for low light and flat light Portraiture, and love it. It is heavy, but it makes for a more stable camera hand held. I use it instead of a Hassie or RZ. An F5 is equally fine.

    Finally, I need the hot AF SLR today to do what I could easily do with a Nikon F 15 years ago, focus quickly and accurately in flat light... without glasses. No bad choices for you, are there ?

  10. #10

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    Well, this is indeed a difficult choice. My manual focus experience is all Canon, and a little Olympus. I wanted to give Nikon a try as well, especially since I've heard their AF is much faster and smarter than Canon's. The thing is, I love those Canon L lenses even though I can't dream to afford them. Does that mean Canon has better lenses overall? I'm so confused.

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