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  1. #11
    SilverGlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur2 View Post
    ...and film cameras are so cheap who cares..........come to think of it, if all film cameras die of old age, there is always digital.
    Thanks for your very helpful explanation. Before reading your post, I was all in a quandry, nearly at the point of suicide....
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  2. #12
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    It is fairly easy to fix - once you have access to the point where the glass of the LCD makes contact with the electronic circuit board.
    This is the most common failure in LCD displays - segments or digits go out. There is a thing called a 'Zebra Strip' - a bit of elastomer with conductive bits running through it that connects between the LCD and the board. The LCD and PCB are held in a metal clip that squeezes then together with the zebra strip between the two. The contact between the zebra strip elastomer and the LCD and PCB gets crummy with age. It is possible to take apart the LCD holder, gently clean the PCB with a pencil eraser and the LCD and zebra strip with a soft toothbrush and some Windex. Putting things back together can be tricky though - you have to make sure the zebra strip is straight and centered - a bit of a PITA.

    The second failure in displays is bleeding - black clouds appear around the digit segments. The display is made from little compartments of liquid crystal 'goo' and if the sealing between the compartments fails they will bleed into the surrounding area and sometimes two segments will join by bleeding into each other. There is to DIY fix for this problem, you have to get new LCD 'glass'.

    Pixel failure in LCD computer screens is sometimes called 'backlight bleeding', but this failure has nothing to do with the failure modes seen in film camera displays.
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  3. #13

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    The mean time to failure of LCDs is about 7 years so it is no surprise we are seeing this problem: Canon used to recommend replacing the LCD every 5 years in then manual for one of their SLRs. Standard electronic circuits generally have a mean time to failure of 20years so there are going to be a number of cameras with good electronics but no way to interact if there is no viewfinder display of information.

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    Thanks for your very helpful explanation. Before reading your post, I was all in a quandry, nearly at the point of suicide....
    <sigh> It's true that the pain of a broken heart, with infuriating problems like dud displays coming up in the worst possible times, can be relished to its own cathartic end. Or you can just do a dance to 'Hot Chip' and get over it.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 12-17-2008 at 01:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #15
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    FWIW, the LCDs on my 1992-vintage EOS Elan and early-'90s Nikon N90 are still fine.
    My 1968 Leicaflex SL shows no sign of it either...
    ;-)
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    Thanks for your very helpful explanation. Before reading your post, I was all in a quandry, nearly at the point of suicide....
    The lenses and the person behind the camera is more important than the camera body....and all the gifted guys using film ATM am sure can get the same results with digital cameras.

    I'm a film guy btw and have two recent Canon T70s and a T90..... if the liquid display lasts say for another 2 years it's cost me 50p/week for their use and if all liquid displays end on all film cameras would just go back to my S3, AV1, FTB, MTL3, EM, Olympus OM10 and Om20...plus using my Bronica etrs and RB67........once they packup and I cant find replacements and film is hard to come by, wouldn't mind using digital equipment....afterall it's all about taking pictures.
    Last edited by Excalibur2; 12-17-2008 at 04:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bnstein View Post
    The mean time to failure of LCDs is about 7 years so it is no surprise we are seeing this problem: Canon used to recommend replacing the LCD every 5 years in then manual for one of their SLRs. Standard electronic circuits generally have a mean time to failure of 20years so there are going to be a number of cameras with good electronics but no way to interact if there is no viewfinder display of information.
    Most educational. Then I'm doing pretty well with my 1Ns that are evidentaly more than 10-13 years old, in excellent condition with no display retardation in or out. I have seen nastily cracked but still functional external displays on heavily used 1 and 1N bodies. That's scary but as working tools the lensmen aren't that concerned: "...so long as the shutter fires, she'll be right!".
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    .

    You're new here, aren't you?
    Indeed, but am not new to using film as I've been using it since about 1952.

  9. #19
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    The only camera I have with a LCD display is a Canon T 90 the LCD is as good as new, but if it fades I'll buy another body, there so cheap at the moment It's not worth worrying about.
    Ben

  10. #20
    Chaplain Jeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    My 1968 Leicaflex SL shows no sign of it either...
    ;-)
    Interstingly, my Minolta Maxxum 9000 has no LCD "bleed" or deterioration of any kind. I'm told that's quite unusual for this model.
    Jeff M


    M3, M5, CLE, Minolta XE7, Minolta Maxxum 9, Minolta Maxxum 9000, Nikon F3HP, etc., etc.

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