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  1. #11
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Of course I'm not going to buy one and use it 'seriously'. But once upon a time you have to admit they sold a lot of them. There are people in my family that still use them; when we go visit for christmas or whatever someone always has one. It got me to thinking what kind of exposure controls they use. My dad used to keep one in his glove box for evidence in case of car crashes. And I have one in my tackle box for taking pictures of trophy fish (it's probably expired by now). They are perfect for stuff like that.

    I know the trip 35 has only two shutter speeds, but I'm not sure if disposables have any AE capabilities at all. Perhaps back in their heyday there were more complicated ones?

    Remember they're not really disposable. Don't throw them out when you've finished the film!
    Really, how do you get the film out? And reload them? I always looked at them and didn't really see a way.

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Really, how do you get the film out? And reload them? I always looked at them and didn't really see a way.
    I was referring to the fact that everyone calls them disposables although you don't throw them out. You take or send them to a lab for processing then (hopefully) they are recycled.

    The proper name is usually 'single use camera' but as I said, I hope they get recycled.

    You can take the film out of most of them yourself. I have done it.

    You need to remove the cardboard cover then you should see some sort of flap on the bottom. These cameras usually use a standard 35mm film canister. When it is assembled the film is wound out onto another internal spool ready for use. As the camera is used the film is wound back into the canister.

    So when all the exposures are used up you have a fully re-wound 35mm film ready for processing.

    I have not tried re-loading one but I'm sure it could be done with a bit of ingenuity. As long as you got the leader onto the take up spool o.k. There is usually some means of winding the film out of the spool on the outside of the case.


    Steve.

  3. #13
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Ken Rockwell published a helpful article once about the Fuji QuickSnap. Apparently not at all a bad camera. It can be reloaded, but that seems a rather complicated process (or not, I don't know Mr. Rockwell's skills).

    http://www.kenrockwell.com/fuji/quicksnap.htm

  4. #14
    Prest_400's Avatar
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    Ken Rockwell's review is interesting, didn't know that disposables have even some superiority compared to some features in DSLRs

  5. #15

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    One time use cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    I wouldn't get the $10 camera. Get the $5 Olympus Trip 35 (mid 1970s, try ebay) or the Nikon L35AF. The former includes exposure compensation and has a real lens which will outshoot pro zooms and the latter even includes (gasp) autofocus! There are much better cameras for no money at all. Don't waste your time.
    This makes the most sense. Most of the later "PHD" cameras were auto loading and some even had auto rewinding. Just in case the user forgot the film had to be rewound, unlike the "One Time Use cameras".

  6. #16
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prest_400 View Post
    Ken Rockwell's review is interesting, didn't know that disposables have even some superiority compared to some features in DSLRs
    They're light. Pro # 1.

    Lets see, the quicksnap and many of those cameras take special cartridges with different shaped spindles to prevent you from reloading. This is not a problem if you bulk load, if else, that presents a real pain. Some take regular canisters, those would be fun, but the process involves a darkbag and careful calibration of the counter thing to get the proper number of frames. I don't know how that's done.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauliej View Post
    BS, before you sign up for the lifetime supply, you may want to try some of CVS's film and have it processed/printed and see how it is. You get what you pay for (except at Sears, as I used to say), so free film may be ok or not. Also, you may want to try some other films in your disposable, and see how they work too. Just my 2 cents, before taxes...

    paulie
    FWIW you can force the CVS cams open, load it w/ kodak, do whatever. Just put the CVS brand film back in and take it back there when you want a free roll.

  8. #18

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    Pro #2 No shutter lag/focus lag.


    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    They're light. Pro # 1.

    Lets see, the quicksnap and many of those cameras take special cartridges with different shaped spindles to prevent you from reloading. This is not a problem if you bulk load, if else, that presents a real pain. Some take regular canisters, those would be fun, but the process involves a darkbag and careful calibration of the counter thing to get the proper number of frames. I don't know how that's done.

  9. #19
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    The best optics in disposable cameras are in the Kodak disposables. The difference is quite noticeable.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20
    Poohblah's Avatar
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    Or...
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/60412-...ra?cat_id=1809
    I don't see why you would need a disposable when there are $13 reloadable point-and-shoots... only problem is, it only accepts 200 or 400 speed film.

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