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  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    OM2n...is it as awesome as it sounds?

    I don't really need another 35mm camera, but I always have to have one next in line. My favorite 35mm camera is my Program Plus because it is simple and very handy. I really like its small size, compared to say a Canon AT1, but the manual mode is annoying because it doesn't use a dial, but rather buttons.

    I'm just looking at the features of the OM2n, and I mean, what compares? It seems like you could do no better in a manual focus, pre-matrix metering camera. Is there some catch? There is one at the local camera shop, but I haven't looked at it closely yet.

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Yes.

    Matt

    P.S. Have you ever used any of the OM cameras? The ergonomics are very good (IMHO) but they are relatively unique. If you like them, the ON2n will really appeal to you.

    Some might argue for an OM4/OM4T or even an OM3/OM3T. I've never owned one, but would like to .

    My OM2s is quite special too.

  3. #3
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    It's never about need. :rolleyes:
    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  4. #4

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    There is no catch.

    From experience, the OM2s (OM2SP) or OM4 are less reliable. Both have a display and extra electronics, that not only do provide more things to go wrong, but will indeed do so.
    I never tried the OM3.

  5. #5

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    IIRC...there is no catch....the Olympus OM cameras and Zuiko lenses were/are superb. They are unorthodox in that they have the shutter speed control surrounding the lens throat, similar to some of the early Nikormat's.

    The OM1 was fully manual with centre-weighted metering whereas the OM2 was auto and manual exposure control. I believe it was one of the first cameras to give OTF metering for both normal and flash lighting (using the T20/32 flash units).

    I think the "n" moniker indicated that the body was "second generation" internals, though exactly the same as the original on the outside, and the "MD" badge on the front indicated it would take the optional winder.

    I had a brace of OM's, but found them a wee bit too small for me to handle, though you could not argue with the lightness of the entire range.

    My advice would be to go into the store and feel the camera before you buy it, as well as carry out all the usual checks.

    Mike

  6. #6

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    I invested heavily in the OM system some years ago. Ergonomically they are lovely, very light, fantastic viewfinders, great lenses and can be picked up for a pittance now (some of the more specialist lenses and flashes are still a bit pricey though). In the end I moved to Nikon because of reliability issues, I always had problems with the electronics and the kept letting me down at the cruical moment. Many people attest to their reliability, but I had two OM-1s break mechanically, and OM-2n that had intermittant electronic problems and an OM-4 that had fried electronics. I was sad to see the back of them (well not quite, they're still in my wardrobe), but in the end I got fed up with them going wrong. I think if you get a 'good' one, they're great, meybe I was unlucky. BTW, if you ever look at an OM-1, see if it has been modified to take different batteries. The older ones had to take mercury batteries (now banned and unavailable), you can get alakline batteries that are physically the same size, but the voltage is different, so exposure can be out.

  7. #7
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    I've used OM cameras since 1977 and have owned OM-10, OM-1n, OM-2n, OM-2SP, OM-4 and OM-4ti. Of those, the OM-2SP was the only one that gave any trouble - the ISO dial was intermittent. I have one OM-4ti that was faulty when I bought it, otherwise all have been 100% reliable. I loved my OM-2n but drowned it, and the insurance replacement was the 2SP because the 2n had been discontinued by then. I still miss the 2n and keep thinking of getting a replacement. As others have said, try and get some experience with one and see if it suits - some people love the ergonmics, others don't. But if you get a good one you should be very happy with it. The "n" designation indicates the later model with a flash-ready LED in the viewfinder and motor drive compatibility (earlier ones can take a winder but not a motor, if I remember correctly).
    Last edited by RH Designs; 01-22-2009 at 05:17 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Since 1977, not 1987. I'm older than I thought!
    Regards,
    Richard.

    RH Designs - My Photography

  8. #8

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    won't be disappointed

    You won't be disappointed by the 2N. It has all the updates that ever went into the plain 2. It is ultra-reliable and there are still plenty of parts available. John, www.zuiko.com

  9. #9
    nsurit's Avatar
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    As with any older camera, you will want one that works. zuiko.com (an apug member) keeps mine running. The cameras are well built and even someone with large hand (that would be me) can get use to using them. Olympus offers a wide range of high quality glass that can be had for relatively few dollars today. You may fall in love with the system Bill Barber

  10. #10
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    The OMs are nice cameras.

    That having been said, there are some pretty nice, small Pentaxes that meet your description and would work with your existing lenses.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

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