Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,735   Posts: 1,515,470   Online: 1076
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    lorirfrommontana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    424
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    50

    My daughter's camera purchase

    Well, my daughter went and got a camera today. She ended up with a Nikon EM. I know nothing about them but will have to get a manuel for her. I guess that you set the appature and the shutter speed is automatic on it? I wouldn't like that (although I'd have less ruined photos because of my dificulty thinking before I take a shot!!!!) but it might be just the ticket for her until she has time to learn about setting these things. She likes that she still does the focusing and she liked how small the camera was. It came with a 50mm 1.8 lens so it ready to go for her. I'll let her borrow my 28mm and 75-200 mm lenses for her trip in the summer. Well, Just though I'd let you know that I'm still around and we'll probebly have another new member soon!
    Lori

  2. #2
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    IIRC, the shutter speed without a battery is about 1/100 second. She could use ISO 100 film and the Sunny Sixteen rule to get the feel of setting expsosure herself. Helping a young person to see and appreciate the different kinds of light is every bit as Important (perhaps more so) than "just" getting the right exposure. My two cents.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #3
    lorirfrommontana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    424
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    50
    Thanks! That is some usefull info I'll pass on (and use myself). I'm still learning all this myself so I guess we get to learn together now. She didn't want a camera like mine because it is heavier but she picked up the EM and liked how it felt. I figure if she enjoys holding it she will use it. I was suprised she didn't get the all auto camera she was looking at last time we were in there. I guess she likes retro stuff so her camera definately looks the part! Especially with the guitar strap with purple designs on it!

    She wants to use it for B&W and wants into my darkroom when it is finished. I'm still supprized she is so interested in my new hobby! She's never been interested in anything I was before so this is pretty fun. We will be able to get out and do some shoots together. Lori

  4. #4
    RedTownCats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North West, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12
    Hi,

    Try this: Nikon EM manual (3.75MB)
    RTC

  5. #5
    lorirfrommontana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    424
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    50
    Thanks!

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3
    It's a nice economy camera that will take a full line of fine Nikkor lenses. Good way to learn traditional photography.

  7. #7
    T42
    T42 is offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    118
    Hi Lori.

    I have an EM that I found for a song several years ago. It took splendid pictures. One gets used to the aperture priority automation and can work with it to have some control of stop action and depth of field. I liked that all my old Nikon lenses worked on it. Unfortunately, the shutter got intermittent and flakey after a while. It is as if there is a disconnection or a bad switch in it someplace. Yuck. Now it's on the shelf.

    Anyway, I understand that the EM was Nikon's smallest F mount SLR from that era (~1980). I like its small, unobtrusive manner and feel in the hand. It's a good starting point, much better than with a P&S in my opinion.

    Happy day.

    Henry
    a certified dinosaur using F, F2, M3, and K4a
    Last edited by T42; 01-27-2009 at 08:09 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: add signature

  8. #8
    lorirfrommontana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    424
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    50
    Well she came over and tried all the different lenses on it and put in some film as I have a few rolls that I didn't want. The battery that was in it is good so it all worked as it should. She loves it! It is a very nice sized little camera for a slr! thanks for all the info we got from you all!
    Lori

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    250
    I had one years ago (until I broke it) and from what I remember there were 3 settings: 'A' for aperture priority, 'X' for flash (1/90th) and 'B' for bulb. There was also a button on the back which gave some compensation for backlighting. Don't forget you have to set the film speed manually! Oh, and the metering thingie doesn't retract so you can't use non-AI lenses. The wind-on lever was nice though – similar to that on the F3.

    Personally I found it too light – I had to stick an auto-winder on to give it a bit of ballast! Still, I hope your daughter enjoys using it.

  10. #10
    cooltouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    340
    It does my heart good to read that there are still youngsters out there who are into "retro" photography. I wouldn't be surprised if, after your daughter has been using her EM for a while and her understanding of exposure increases, that she'll begin to want more control. When/if that occurs, a decent upgrade will be one of the Nikon FM or FE models. They are also quite light and small, and provide most all the flexibility than a photographer would need.

    Best,

    Michael

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin