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  1. #11

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    I'll have to check this 2000 out better when I get a 283 in the mail that's a present from a member here? I thank you for the info now I might figure out what is what? So I can see I have to learn/remember the numbers from the math Chris pointed out to use a flash with a Minolta SRT 100. I'll see what I can do? Thanks for the info!!
    Terry
    I'm brain damaged,what's your excuse?

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Terry:

    The math isn't bad, and once you have done it and recorded it in a table, it is really easy to use.

    Example: If you end up with a Guide Number of 80 for the film you are using, and your subject is 10 feet away from the flash, then set your f/stop on your lens to 80/10 = f/8. Or, if the subject was 5 feet away from the flash, you would set your f/stop on your lens to 80/5 = f/16.

    If you have a Vivitar 283 you can use it on the Minolta SRT100 as well.

    Matt

  3. #13

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    You don't need to do the math. You need to estimate camera to subject distance. Most flash including the 2000 should have the calculator dial to figure out the aperture without the need for math. With the 283 you just select the aperture then the flash can automatically control its output to match. To use the 283 on the SRT100 you would need an adapter because the SRT100 doesn't have a hot shoe. It does have a cold shoe.

  4. #14

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    Hi,And I wonder If the 2000 is the same as the 283 in that it can control it's output? I just wonder IF it'd be a good match to the XD 11 and the auto programs it has! My Friend and I both are new to flash and using one! The 283 that I have coming has the cord needed so that's good to go for the SRT it's the XD I wonder about or should I have posted this in Lighting forum?
    Thanks for the info,
    Terry
    I'm brain damaged,what's your excuse?

  5. #15

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    I found the manual for the Vivitar 2000 flash unit.
    Set the switch in front to A.
    Determine the aperture depends on the ISO of your film by looking at the chart on the back of the flash. Use the aperture column that is highlighted ( black number on white background). for example ISO 100= f/4, ISO 200=f/5.6 etc..
    Set the XD-11 shutter speed dial at X.
    Set the M/A/S level by the side of the shutter speed dial to M.
    Set the aperture ring on the lens to the aperture that matches that's on the flash (i.e. ISO100=f/4...)
    Make sure your subject distance is between 3.5ft to 15ft.
    Shoot away. The flash will automatically control its output for correct exposure within this distance range.

    With the SRT-100, the procedure is almost the same.
    Set the shutter speed dial to 60
    Set the lens aperture as indicated on the chart on the flash.
    Pull out the sync cord from the back of the flash and plug it into the PC sync terminal marked X on the side of the lens mount.

    That's it.
    Last edited by Chan Tran; 02-05-2009 at 09:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    There are many ways to do this. The 100% best way is to obtain owners manuals for your gear and to consult them. We can math it up til we're blue in the face but if arithmetic is not one's forte, then more than likely there is an easy to follow chart in a thin paper booklet that indicates results published by someone who has already done the work for you.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #17

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    Hi, I also found the manuals for the 2000 and the 283 and the sekonic meter! Thanks Mr. Butkus!! I have to read them and learn now. Any other thoughts on this shall go on in Lighting.
    Terry
    I'm brain damaged,what's your excuse?

  8. #18
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Again View Post
    Hi All. My Friend has a XD-11 Minolta Camera and I wonder if a Vivitar 2000 Flash I gave her is ok to use with this camera?

    I have a Sekonic Auto-Lumi ModelL-158 I wonder If Anyone knows of this Compny And Model's Accurate or not? Thanks for any replys!

    Good morning, Terry;

    The Vivitar 2000 is an early version flash unit that has a high trigger circuit voltage; around 220 volts. I would use the Wien "Safe-Sync" with this flash unit and a modern camera.

    The Vivitar 283 flash is available in two (2) versions, the early and the late. The early ones had a high trigger circuit voltage; the later ones have a low voltage trigger circuit. The best way to check it is with a voltmeter. You can go from the pin in the very center of the shoe and the metal part on the outside of the shoe to measure the voltage while the unit is turned on and charged. The industry specification calls for 20 volts or less, but many camera manufacturers ask for a trigger voltage applied to them of no more than 6 volts. Again, if there is any doubt or question, the Wien "Safe-Sync."

    Both the Vivitar 2000 and the Vivitar 283 are electronic flash units that have an "Automatic" mode. They have a built-in light sensor that can measure the light falling on the subject and stop the flash tube when the sensor thinks the light is correct. All you need to do is set the film ASA speed on the flash unit and set it to "Auto." We have talked about this before.

    The specific camera flash circuit for the Minolta XD-11 is not known to me. It is right around the time when they switched from the electro-mechanical flash contacts to the electronic switches. To be safe, I would use something like the Wien "Safe-Sync" with the Vivitar 2000 and probably with the 283 flash unit.

    The Sekonic L-158 Auto-Lumi is a good light meter, if it has not been damaged. I believe that it has a selenium light cell. You can check to see if it still works and is in calibration by taking a light reading outside on a sunny day. Set the ASA scale to 125. Go outside and point the light meter at a "normal scene" or at an 18% grey reflectance card. You are making a "reflected light" reading. Adjust the dial to move the pointer with the round circle over the meter needle. Then looking at the point where "f 16" appears on the dial, right next to it on the shutter speed part of the dial should be 125, just like the ASA number you set earlier. If they match, or they are very close, the meter is good.

    For your concern about the flash unit trigger voltage being not compatible with the camera flash synchronization circuitry, the Wien "Safe-Sync" is a cheap form of insurance, and will provide piece of mind.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  9. #19

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    The Wein Safe Sync is selling for around $50 and is not really cheap. The cameras that the original poster has are the Minolta SRT100 and XD-11 both are of the same vintage or even older than the Vivitar 2000 and 283 flash units and can handle the high sync voltage without a problem. Either of the camera isn't worth much more than the price of the Wein Safe Sync unit.

  10. #20

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    The Main Concern I still have is with the XD 11 and It having more auto programs even though with the flash the camera would be in Manual there might be some leakage? And the same leakage problem for the SRT 100 effecting the meter? IF either one of these cameras fries there would be no buying replacement out of next week's check!! IF one were to get a Safe Sync for a hot shoe what would it look like/where would it fit? One For the cold shoe I know goes on the snyc cord. As IF we could get the bucks to get one,but one never knows? Better to know and safe than sorry!! I reall HATE I told you SO!!!:-)
    Terry
    I'm brain damaged,what's your excuse?

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