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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur2 View Post
    **The OM10 with the manual adapter, will certainly do, that particular model was very popular in this country**

    erm no! The OM20 is better, the OM10 has designed faults (well bad layout that can course errors in use), but still cheap skate in that Olympus ensured you could only use their own flashguns..i.e. no flash sync setting for any flashgun.
    Bad layout? Which control specifically?

    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur2 View Post
    How do I know? Well I have an OM10 and OM20.......I'm disappointed with these cameras although they gave good results with correct exposures, but found even cheap canons are better.
    The difference between a cheap OM and a cheap Canon is more or less the lens attached on it, unless you compare cameras with quite different characteristics. Like different metering options etc. I think any camera with a working shutter, a decent meter and nice glass on it can give good results.

  2. #12

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    ***Bad layout? Which control specifically?**

    On the OM10, the dial for changing ASA, it's also for auto and "b"....if it's not set on auto but moves to "b" slightly because of using the shutter winder that catches the slider under the dial (because of your thumb nail or even changing asa setting), your shot is ruined...it's easily done. On the OM20 it's just an asa dial.

    ***The difference between a cheap OM and a cheap Canon is more or less the lens attached on it***

    Well of course but even a cheap Nikon EM or Canon, can use any flashgun.
    Last edited by Excalibur2; 02-22-2009 at 08:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    Ok, the ASA dial layout can be considered a design flaw. On the other hand, can't you use any flash of that era on an OM10? Granted, I'm not the biggest fan of flash photography, I don't know much, but you'll get rather primitive functions and it will work. If you want auto flash, you'll have to settle for a single aperture, like f/4 at 100 ASA, or f/8 at 400. If you want to use other apertures, you'll have to set shutter speed manually at 1/60th max and do some calculations based on the information from the flash manufacturer.

  4. #14
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    If you're going to go all manual, I vote for the older professional Nikon F series - just be aware that the meters on the oldest F and F2 prisms may be problematic. There are people who claim to fix them, but the repairs may cost more than the eye-level prism. Personally, I think the original Nikon F with an eye-level (non-metering) prism is just about perfect. The Pentax K1000 is actually very similar. Both take readily available lenses (in Nikon's case, all but the most modern "G" series F-mount lenses will work fine on an F body; I'm not sure about Pentax and the K-mount).

    I have a friend who still uses an old Canon FTb and this is also a good choice; the FD mount is different from the current Canon EF mount, but there are tons of FD lenses out there.

    Another piece of gear to get is an inexpensive hand held meter, preferably the kind with a dial instead of a digital readout. Nothing will teach exposure better, in my humble opinion.
    “Art is what we call... the thing an artist does." Seth Godin

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    Ok, the ASA dial layout can be considered a design flaw. On the other hand, can't you use any flash of that era on an OM10? Granted, I'm not the biggest fan of flash photography, I don't know much, but you'll get rather primitive functions and it will work. If you want auto flash, you'll have to settle for a single aperture, like f/4 at 100 ASA, or f/8 at 400. If you want to use other apertures, you'll have to set shutter speed manually at 1/60th max and do some calculations based on the information from the flash manufacturer.
    Yes any flash will work with the OM10, BUT if you set it at f4 or f8 in a dark room the auto exposure still works which could be up to 1 sec before the shutter closes, so you could get blurr or extraneous things in your pic. I assume when you get a dedicated Olympus flashgun you don't have this problem.....maybe you don't get this problem with the manual adaptor fitted... I could be bothered to find out, as I was so disappointed in Olympus's cheap offerings, quickly switched to canon and Konica.

  6. #16
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Try an AE-1 Program. It has totally auto-exposure for you to start off with, then you can use it as a fully manual camera too. It is a fairly strong camera an I have taken one through a lot.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  7. #17
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    Nicholas Linden has a good point about the Nikon F3 camera, especially in this country. I myself run two Nikon F3 bodies and swear by them.

    On the Photographic Trader No. 137 which still hasn't hit the newsstands. Look on page 26 third column F3 body $135.

    Page 33 first column, Nikon F3HP $195. The difference between the standard F3 and the F3HP is a different viewfinder. The HP finder is designed for glass wearers, but everyone wanted the HP version so eventually Nikon stopped production of the normal finder and made nearly all of the F3 bodies with the HP viewfinder.

    I'm sure there are more, but these were in ads I had circled as value for money.

    I still suggest the OM10 body with the manual adapter, in this country Olympus sold heaps of them, so they are around.

    Mick.

  8. #18

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    I agree with Mick on an earlier post in this thread about the old Pentax K1000's... great & simple & cheap 35mm cameras. They survive rough treatment in my experience also. In the 80's I used a Pentax Super A a lot, I didn't have much money, it wasn't expensive, they are still around & I think good to learn with because they have fully manual OR fully auto so you can switch back & forth to compare all the settings.
    Last edited by blokeman; 02-23-2009 at 02:03 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

  9. #19

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    ***I still suggest the OM10 body with the manual adapter, in this country Olympus sold heaps of them***

    Well now we can buy many different film cameras for peanuts to compare (which I have done as I couldn't afford ALL of them in the past), and the OM10 having to a have a seperate adaptor to get manual speeds is laughable.

  10. #20

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    Also keep in mind that nearly all of these cameras, except for those built in the last 10 years, will probably need to have new foam seals.

    It's a simple job, but it's something to know before you buy, especially if the camera was made before 1990.

    I probably would look for something that takes a modern S76 battery rather than the older 625 mercury cell. And I'd probably go for a simpler camera rather one that is electronic.

    The Pentax K1000 continues to be a very popular camera and for good reason. It's simple to operate, reliable and readily available. It's also a nice size camera for big or small hands. It's very similar to the Pentax Spotmatic.

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