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  1. #1

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    What Should I Buy

    Hi guys/girls, I'm new to film photography, having picked it at school this year, and am curious to what camera I should look for. I was told to look for a fully manual variety. I looked at various Canons but was later recommended to look for a Pentax, Nikon or Olympus. I got sniped a couple of times by some eBay bidders after bidding some OM-1s. Unfortunately OM-1s are not very common on Australian soil and am looking for a good alternative. What should I be looking for (make/model). Thanks for your help.
    Cameran00b

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by cameran00b View Post
    Hi guys/girls, I'm new to film photography, having picked it at school this year, and am curious to what camera I should look for. I was told to look for a fully manual variety. I looked at various Canons but was later recommended to look for a Pentax, Nikon or Olympus. I got sniped a couple of times by some eBay bidders after bidding some OM-1s. Unfortunately OM-1s are not very common on Australian soil and am looking for a good alternative. What should I be looking for (make/model). Thanks for your help.
    Cameran00b
    Presumably "manual" means "shutter speeds and apertures can be set by hand". Assuming that cameras with built-in meters and an automatic exposure (AE) mode are allowed, there's a vast choice. I would suggest Nikon - F3 (top pro model from the 1980s, bodies can be found now in good working order for $80 - 100), FM3a (great camera, too new to be cheap), FM2n, FM2, or even an FE2, FE or F2 (these 3 getting a little old now). Either way a Nikon body opens the way to a huge selection of lenses. Olympus has its fans, not including me (I don't find them durable enough, although the lenses are great).

    Stand back and wait for a lot more recommendations ...

  3. #3

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    Hi New Person welcome!!!
    I myself like Minolta Srt In the 101 or you could check out the Rokkerfiles.com online for info on things Minolta in the SRT and so on! I'm not sure If your country outlawed the mercury battery or not? If so no problem there are suitable replacements that work!! But the SRT is a manual camera and you can learn with it and still use it after you've learned and lenses are still at a decent price and with the value of the dollar on the world market a real good buy I bet for you!!? You'll get lot's of opinions on what's the best brand to buy to start with I hope you learn well and enjoy!!
    Terry
    I'm brain damaged,what's your excuse?

  4. #4

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    You might look again at canon as the FTB or AT1 might suit you, and FD lenses are common and still going cheap.

  5. #5

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    Hi, a camera that has a full manual mode can be usefull. It doesn't need to be a mechanical camera without automation. The OM1 you mentioned earlier is a purely mechanical camera. You need to set both the aperture *and* the exposure time before taking a shot. While it can be beneficial (as in battery independant and somewhat more educational) it also has some disadvantages. For starters, you *will* be slower when taking photographs. Focusing, selecting the appropriate aperture and setting the shutter speed will slow you down and you might lose some opportunities for a good shot. The OM1 also has a disadvantage that you should consider. It's light meter relied on mercury batteries. These have been banned years ago and you will either need to make a modification, or use a battery adapter.

    I'd actually suggest buying an OM2n. It has aperture priority mode *and* manual mode. It uses silver oxide batteries that can be found everywhere. If your budget is very low you can actually get an OM10 in nice condition, provided that it comes with a manual adapter! These are very common cameras, but not so well built as the single digit models (OM1,2,3,4). Additionaly, the meter is not that good as OM2's is, but it doesn't mean it's not good for most purposes.

    Finally, all brands you mentioned are just fine! There's no need to pick Olympus specifically. All brands have excellent lenses that complement their bodies. For a start I'd suggest a 50mm lens.

  6. #6
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    For Australia and Olympus, you have already found out that it is hard to get the early OM1 bodies. The OM10 with the manual adapter, will certainly do, that particular model was very popular in this country

    One of the most prolific cameras used in Australia was the Pentax K1000, this used to be the standard for many photographic schools in this country. Pentax is possibly a better choice as there are squillions of Pentax lenses, or Pentax mount lenses available.

    Nikon is also very popular, but normally most Nikon bodies are slightly more expensive than brands other than Canon. The FM and later variations is possibly the best body for your purposes. I would also look at the FE and FE2, which although they have aperture priority, can be used entirely in manual mode.

    You could do yourself a favour and grab the new edition of the "Photographic Trader" The latest issue is number 137, March-April. I received mine last week as I subscribe to it, it should hit the newsstands this week. You will usually find more cameras than you can poke a stick at. It has a yellow A4 cover, can't be missed.

    Where are you? We may be able to direct you to a particular store near you, if we have a location.

    Mick.

  7. #7

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    You might want to check out Canon F-1 or the FTb. Both are durable and there still plenty of FD lenses around.

    Jeff

  8. #8

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    you can't beat a pentax k1000.
    they are great!
    i got mine in 1982, and still use it

    have fun!
    john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  9. #9
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    In a Nikon you may want to try for an F3 or F4. Both these can be used in either full manual or fully automatic mode and sell for ridiculously low prices. It is nice to have some automation for times you are capturing action or taking family pics and don't have time to think much about exposure and knob fiddling. The FM2 and FE2 are other good choices, but are overpriced in comparison with the prices asked for the 'professional' F through F5 series cameras.

    Most manual film cameras are getting quite old - the OM1 dates to 1972. Parts for many old cameras can't be found and the cameras are beginning to fail from old age. A common problem is the metering, the light meters in consumer cameras are too cheaply made to last for a long period of time.

    The Nikon F and F2, though even older, will hold up - they may need a clean and lube and set of light seals, but they will be good for another 50 years. Ditto the Canon F1, but parts are much harder to come by.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 02-22-2009 at 09:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  10. #10

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    **The OM10 with the manual adapter, will certainly do, that particular model was very popular in this country**

    erm no! The OM20 is better, the OM10 has designed faults (well bad layout that can course errors in use), but still cheap skate in that Olympus ensured you could only use their own flashguns..i.e. no flash sync setting for any flashgun.
    How do I know? Well I have an OM10 and OM20.......I'm disappointed with these cameras although they gave good results with correct exposures, but found even cheap canons are better.

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