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  1. #1

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    Being creative in aperture priority

    Just picked up a Pentax ESII & SMC Takumar 2.5/135mm lens in minty condition.Since the purchase was made locally I was able to check out the camera/lens combo before laying down my $.Nice to be able to kick the tires,so to speak.
    Besides shifting the depth of field is there any other way to be creative with the ESII?

    Thank You

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Of course, there's the exposure over-ride below the rewind crank that allows you to give additional or less exposure. In practice there are no reasons why you can't be as creative with an ESII as with any other 35mm SLR.

    Ian

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    Lying about the film speed is usually the way to add some more control to an automatic camera. You do this manually, with an exposure compensation feature if the camera has it, or with both. I change the EI on my Yashica Electro 35 all the time. I simply view it as my roundabout shutter speed control. (However, even at box speed, the meter that looks like it should be really cheesy works very well. It is very low tech. All changing the film speed does is to change the size of an aperture over the meter.)
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 03-05-2009 at 08:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  4. #4
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    I agree. Creativity is your domain, the camera is along for the ride. It may take the form of creatively out witting an automatic feature, or shooting sharp and strait with more emphasis on physical composition rather than subject isolation through DOF. Being pushed to see in new ways can be very enlightening.

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    You have come across a nice camera, and has been said, you have some measure of control. Use it well! Your lens is really nice, by the way. Pentax fixed focal length lenses are very tasty indeed in my experience. I love the out of focus qualities.

    Have fun!

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kennedy View Post
    Besides shifting the depth of field is there any other way to be creative with the ESII?
    You're looking in the wrong place for creativity. It has nothing to do with your camera, and everything to do with your imagination. You can be creative with a brick.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  7. #7
    darinwc's Avatar
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    "Besides shifting the depth of field is there any other way to be creative with the ESII?"

    Nope, thats about it.. aperture priority, you are controlling the depth of field mainly. And that is the majority of what photographers want to use. If you want to blur motion you can stop down but in bright light the camera may still use a fast enough shutter speed so you dont get the effect.

    Also, take into account that a normal or telephoto lens is usually sharpest when stopped down 2 or more stops.
    Wide angle lenses usually need to be stopped down quite a bit to correct aberrations.

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darinwc View Post
    "Besides shifting the depth of field is there any other way to be creative with the ESII?"

    Nope, thats about it.. aperture priority, you are controlling the depth of field mainly. And that is the majority of what photographers want to use. If you want to blur motion you can stop down but in bright light the camera may still use a fast enough shutter speed so you dont get the effect.
    Not correct

    The camera can be used manually for shutter speeds between 1/60th & 1/1000th. While the camera is aperture priority on Auto you still have full control over the shutter sped used because the exposure is related to the Aperture & Shutter speed, there's also +2 & +4 as well as -½ of exposure factor.

    Any form of auto is always a compromise but it should never hinder creativity were a degree of over-ride is possible.

    Ian

  9. #9
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darinwc View Post
    "Besides shifting the depth of field is there any other way to be creative with the ESII?"

    Nope, thats about it.. aperture priority, you are controlling the depth of field mainly. And that is the majority of what photographers want to use.
    ???? Are you serious, darinwc ???

    I'm somewhat addled by this - I thought I was considerably closer to the majority of photographers, and depth of field as a "tool in the box" is certainly NOT my dominant obsession, although I have used it before.

    Uh ... the amount of certitude implied here tends to drag this from a statement of opinion to an established fact...?? Where did you get this information ? - I'd like to attempt to duplicate your line of reasoning.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #10

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    Aperture priority gives you as much "creative" capability as manual. At the end of the day your film needs a specific "quantity" of light to be correctly exposed. Your own EI tests will determine how much. With AE you have the same control over DoF or shutter speed as you do in manual. If you open the aperture - you must shorten the shutter speed - as you do in manual. If you need a slower shutter speed than the lighting permits you need an ND filter - as you do in manual. Even if you want to use a separate incident meter you can set your preferred aperture and adjust ISO to achieve the shutter speed indicated by the incident meter. Sure, this is a little more cumbersome, but you still have the same controls as with any other 35mm camera.

    At least it seems that way to me.

    BobH
    "Why is there always a better way?"

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