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  1. #1

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    Wide angle suggestions

    Hi! I have a Minolta AF mount camera and am currently maxing out my 28mm wide. It just isn't wide enough for what I need, being indoors, there isn't room to just back up further. Is there some easy way to see without having anything wider to say I should be looking for something like the 17-35's or the 19-35's or so forth? I'm just concerned about getting something that either wouldn't be wide enough, or is too wide, as well as expense, as I can't go affording the G series. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    I can't give you much brand specific advice, but I really think you should consider a 20mm lens.

    24mm wouldn't be far enough away from your 28mm and anything wider than about 18mm could really be "too" wide in many situatuations (lenses around 20mm: 18-21 in practice, depending on the system, are my favorites).

    Also, I'd reccomend a prime instead of a zoom. With a notorious exception (not Minolta), 20mm primes will generally outperform zooms covering the same FL, especially if low distortion is important to you.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  3. #3

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    I agree, I live in the Nikon world and cannot comment for Minolta, but I've found the 20mm a perfect wide angle lens, both indoors and outdoors.

  4. #4
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    A 20mm lens would be a useful addition, bearing in mind that the smaller the optic, the more distant subjects will appear and distortion will be conspicuous if not rectilinear. Rectilinear zooms or primes from 17 to 30mm will be very expensive so I think your budget will also be a consideration and 20mm would be great to start off with, as it was for me way back in 1990. Whatever you settle on, you will need to practice 'anchor composition' (a key skill of visual literacy) especially noting distortion and whether you wish to employ that creatively or keep the optic level to minimise the effect. One optic to steer well clear of is a fisheye lens (14mm to 8mm typically): everybody has seen this effect, too much in my opinion, and is best left to gear geeks to play with.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  5. #5

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    I have a 17, 20, and a 24. I can't make my mind up which one I like the best.

    Jeff

  6. #6

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    Yeah, I want to stay away from the fisheyes. Would it make sense to get a cheapie zoom to figure out which length works best, then get a prime based on that? There are some of those I've seen around 100$ or so, going to around 400$ for the better ones I guess. Also, what is meant by anchor composition, I've never heard of that term before.

  7. #7
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sage View Post
    Yeah, I want to stay away from the fisheyes. Would it make sense to get a cheapie zoom to figure out which length works best, then get a prime based on that? There are some of those I've seen around 100$ or so, going to around 400$ for the better ones I guess. Also, what is meant by anchor composition, I've never heard of that term before.
    The wide-angle zoom idea makes sense to me. Better yet would be to rent one, if you can find one in Maxxum mount. Then you can figure out what focal lengths you are actually using the most, and proceed accordingly. You might even decide that you're hooked on the zoom and forego buying another prime lens.
    Charles Hohenstein

  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sage View Post
    Yeah, I want to stay away from the fisheyes. Would it make sense to get a cheapie zoom to figure out which length works best, then get a prime based on that? There are some of those I've seen around 100$ or so, going to around 400$ for the better ones I guess. Also, what is meant by anchor composition, I've never heard of that term before.

    Anchor composition is very important when an ultra-wide angle lens is used for landscape imaging. The wider (smaller) your lens is, the more distant and smaller features will be (scale) and potentially there will be a confusing jumble of subject matter of no particular interest. In landscapes, I actively seek out large rocks, vegetation etc for foreground interest and then 'build' the image around that. Especially important for 17mm.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  9. #9

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    For the great indoors you can not go too short, exept for the fish-eyes.
    My prime lens for indoors is a 14-28mm Olympus zoom, expesive and beautifull.
    As a secondairy lens I use a 22-44mm zoom for the "details" : here in Brazil you have many ambients in one ambient and all have to be photographed.

    Peter, Goiânia, Brazil

  10. #10
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I had 35mm, 28mm and 20mm lenses for my Minoltas. I got rid of the 35mm because it was too close to the normal lens. The 20mm was my favorite, but I used it sparingly. It was good for taking in most of a room when I was travelling in Europe.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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