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Thread: Minolta 7 or 9?

  1. #41
    Java's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedidiah Smith View Post
    Hope that helps,
    Jed
    ERR!! No

    Now I do want one and I was trying not buy any more film cameras :o (well lent is nearly over).
    Those pictures look really nice and sharp too (even on this crappy moniter).

    Xavier: thank you for your thoughts, but I think the Dynax 7 is the one. I have to many heavy cameras and don't need the extra build quality the 9 offers. I believe (mind you no expert in this) that the 7 will work with the SSM lens. But that it is not an issue either because if I was going to get more then ones lens it would have to be a Minolta own brand one. Simply because I would like Minolta Camera with Minolta Lens (bit of a lens snob )
    Another reason for not being bothered about the SSM lens is I would not be going down the digital route with this kit. Olympus is my choice for digital.
    Stack of 35mm stuff, some 120 stuff and lots of other junk to make it work

    Keep it simple. ~ Alfred Eisenstaedt

  2. #42
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    Yeh, all of the 7s have SSM in them, so that's not a worry. As for buying Minolta only glass... Well I understand. I personally like the late Minolta designs myself, compared to most of the Sony versions. That said a few of the Sony designs have been and might be unreleased Minolta Lens designs. And you may wish to change your opinion if they get the 24-105 F4 constant SSM lens out anytime soon. Might be a great replacement for the 24-105 walkabout lens. So yeh while I like the older designs and they go well with the bodies (especially the G trim lenses matching the gold 7 ) but I won't be denying myself some great glass from Sony if it comes along

    Oh and if you want to save weight it might be worth denying yourself the grip. It's incredibly tempting and the addition of being able to load standard AA cells is very useful. But a grip loaded with batteries can add extra weight. On the plus side it's detachable so you're not stuck with the weight if you don't want it. Try and buy it bundled though if you do. You'll save a lot of cash over buying the camera and then the grip. Good luck

  3. #43
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    I can resist anything but temptation, and 'temptation' has Dynax 7 (aka Alpha 7) written all over it... drool...
    Film and digital; best of both worlds. JapanesePhotos.Asia.

  4. #44
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Xavier View Post
    Oh and if you want to save weight it might be worth denying yourself the grip. It's incredibly tempting and the addition of being able to load standard AA cells is very useful.
    I couldn't do without mine... I shoot about 80% of all my pictures vertical, and it is a bliss to have the vertical grip. In addition, using rechargeable NiMH AA batteries saves on battery cost.

    There is one extra good thing about the vertical grip though: contrary to most modern grips used with digital camera's, the Dynax 7 grip doesn't use up the camera's battery compartment. This means you don't have to pop-in and out the camera battery when placing or removing the grip. Better still, you can use BOTH battery sources, the choice of which is controlled by a switch on the vertical grip. (Do note though, that switching to "camera" source will NOT disable the usage of the vertical grip, it just tells the camera to use it's own source of energy).

    Much better solution than most other camera's.

    There is one other last thing that's nice about the 7 compared to the 9:

    - The 7 has a "quick" MF/AF switch button. It's located next to the back turning wheel, ready to be used by your thumb, that allows you to switch between AF and MF modes instantly (I know some modern lenses allow (micro-) adjustments of focus in AF mode as well). It will dislock the AF motor at any point in time, and allow you to start using MF without explicitly using the AF-mode switch on the front on the camera, that would require you to lower the camera from your eye before switching. With the AF/MF button, you can hold the camera to your eye and switch at will...

    I use this feature often...
    Last edited by Marco B; 04-03-2009 at 06:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

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  5. #45
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    You're right with the grip. I keep mine on most of the time, but then I don't take my 7 out without a camera bag for it so it's not compact :P Although I never regret it, my slingshot strap clip wasnt fully on once and it popped open while I was running for a small plane on a runway in Spain somewhere. So the bag hit the hard concrete. Luckily all was good.
    I take a really old XE-7 slung over my shoulder without a cover or anything even if its raining if I don't want to carry my gear about. However I was looking to get one of those small Kata bags, might tempt me to use a D7 spartan kit As for rechargables you can get CR2 rechargable batteries now aswell, that might be useful to know.

  6. #46

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    Marco - you are right about the quick MF/AF button on the back of the 7. I had forgotten about that feature when comparing them. It is quite handy in the field, especially for fine-tuning an AF that you don't feel has quite gotten it, or when the camera may choose the wrong plane to focus on, and you can quickly correct that.
    Good luck on the 7 and 9 choices!
    Jed

  7. #47
    Rob Skeoch's Avatar
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    Well I bought a 7... just waiting for it to show up. I took a look at my sony lenses and most of them are ssm and I figured I'd never find a 9 that was converted.
    I can't wait to try it with some of the zeiss glass.... I have the 135mm F1.8, 24-70 F2.8, 85mm f1.4 and the new 16-35mm.

    -rob
    Rob Skeoch
    This is my blog http://thepicturedesk.blogspot.com/
    This my website for photo supplies...
    www.bigcameraworkshops.com
    This is my website for Rangfinder gear
    www.rangefinderstore.com

  8. #48
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Congratulations on your purchase! You won't regret it...

    I don't know if you got the manual with it, but if not, here is a description of how to RELOAD a film:

    - First, you need to change a number of custom settings. Custom settings are set by opening the small metal plate just beneath the screen on the back of the camera, it hides a number of small buttons, including one designated "Custom"
    - Press the "Custom" button. You now enter the custom menu. By using the front rotating dial on the camera, you can navigate all custom settings, by using the back rotating dial you can choose a setting for a custom setting.
    - Navigate to custom setting 3, "Film tip" and set it to "Leader LeftOut - SelFrame Trans". This will tell the camera not to rewind completely, but to leave the film leader out when rewinding so that you can reload it.
    - Navigate to custom setting 8, "Frame counter", and set it to "Count up". Since you're going to reload it, and will need to set the frame number to wind to, it is far more easy to have the camera count up instead of downwards. You will only need to write down the last frame number visible before rewinding.
    - Press the "Custom" button (or the camera's release button) to exit the custom menu.

    Now, here's how to RELOAD a film:
    - Make sure you've written the last frame number down on the film canister when rewinding it! (Yes, I have occasionally had my film screwed up by forgetting this )

    - Reload the film as normal in the camera
    - Now open the little metal plate again and press the "Adj" (Adjust) button for more than 3 seconds
    - The camera will now go into the reload mode and display a message for you to set the frame number, set it by using the front rotating dial (I think you can also use the back one).

    IT IS RECOMMENDED TO ADD 1 EXTRA FRAME TO AVOID PARTIAL DOUBLE EXPOSURES! E.g. if the last frame number visible before rewinding was 18, set it to 19.

    - Now press the "Adj" button again, the camera will automatically wind forward.

    You're done!

    Marco
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

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