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  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony-S View Post
    While I'm sure that's fine for some color negative films for shorter duration exposures, I'm also sure that longer exposures with slide film will cause all kinds of problem. Thus, the use of autoexposure without some means of compensating for the reciprocity effect, which varies by film, seems to obviate the need for such a mode.
    It may seem that way to the casual observer but keep in mind that all of these AE capable machines have a + or - 2 exposure compensation control that can be used - along with recommended filters.

    Now, if you were to look at the datasheets for some slide film - like Fuji Velvia 50 for example, it states to add +1 stop at up to 32 seconds which is well within the range of the control. Fuji Velvia 100 requires +2/3 compensation and the same for Velvia 100f. These are all within the exposure compensation control of these cameras except that only the LX can actually accommodate these extended exposure times past the others limitations.

    I am glad you pointed this out as the spec for Velvia 50 states exposure duration of 64 seconds is listed as not recommended while Velvia 100/100f list up to 8 minutes but do not have any other qualifiers as the Velvia 50. May provide some interesting results!

  2. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    Now, if you were to look at the datasheets for some slide film - like Fuji Velvia 50 for example, it states to add +1 stop at up to 32 seconds which is well within the range of the control.
    Are you sure about that? Velvia 50 used to start suffering from the reciprocity effect after 1 to 4 seconds, plus it required magenta filtration. This is one of the reasons I use Provia 100F - it has much better reciprocity characteristics. Has Velvia 50's forumulation changed in the last few years? Here's a shot with Velvia 50 that exemplifies its weak reciprocity characteristics.


    St. Mary Falls, Glacier National Park, USA

  3. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony-S View Post
    Are you sure about that? Velvia 50 used to start suffering from the reciprocity effect after 1 to 4 seconds, plus it required magenta filtration. This is one of the reasons I use Provia 100F - it has much better reciprocity characteristics. Has Velvia 50's forumulation changed in the last few years? Here's a shot with Velvia 50 that exemplifies its weak reciprocity characteristics.
    The Fuji Velvia 50 datasheet (AF3-0221E2) does list a range of durations but it does state not recommended over 64 seconds.

    So I conducted about a 7 hour start trails test - my first ever, using Velvia 50 and got the image below with no compensation or filtering. I learned that I should know if the moon will appear in the scene sometime during the exposure. I think the yellow pine trees - normally green, was due to light from around my backyard.



    Anyway, plenty more trial and error to have fun with. I like the that there are uncharted territories to explore . . .

  4. #74
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    Provia and Acros will both go out to 2 minutes with no compensation. That makes cameras that can time out that far on AE very useful, if the scene will not fool the meter, as can happen. Even if it is fooled, one nice thing about night exposures is that they are more subjective. A range of exposures from mostly dark to full daylight will all work, depending on what is wanted. An LX will attempt to make a night scene look like daylight, and will go all night to do it, if the batteries hold out.
    I like night scenes to look like night, so less exposure is generally desirable. Using the compensation dial helps accomplish this, as do reciprocity characteristics, if they come into play. I seldom concern myself with the color shift, though I will compensate according to the manufacturer's directions sometimes.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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