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  1. #1
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Best metering in a manual-focus camera?

    What manual-focus cameras have the best metering?

    Some have spot or partial, most have averaging. Some are shutter-priority, some aperture priority, some full auto, some 'program'..

  2. #2

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    Canon T90's Advanced Metering.

    Quote Originally Posted by darinwc View Post
    What manual-focus cameras have the best metering?

    Some have spot or partial, most have averaging. Some are shutter-priority, some aperture priority, some full auto, some 'program'..
    In my opinion, the Canon T90 has the most advanced metering, that I've ever encountered.

    It has 3 different metering patterns; average, central 12 % area & spot 3 % area.

    It has metered manual, shutter priority, aperture priority, 7 different programs,
    ( although 2 are the same ) & 2 different stop-down metering programs.

    It has TTL & E-TTL flash metering, plus a 1/250th sec. flash synch speed.

    It only uses 4 AA batteries & it can use Lithium's.

    It's very light weight & has a very bright viewfinder.

  3. #3

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    A meter is only as good as the person interpreting the information. As I tell my students, the meter measure everything as 18% gray, so if what you point your camera towards isn't 18%, then on your film it will be 18%, unless you make the proper adjustments to the camera's settings.

    Everything you've mentioned are simply tools. None of them are better or worse.

    Train yourself to see as a meter sees is the best method for using any system. Or get a handheld incident meter.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  4. #4
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    A meter is only as good as the person interpreting the information. As I tell my students, the meter measure everything as 18% gray, so if what you point your camera towards isn't 18%, then on your film it will be 18%, unless you make the proper adjustments to the camera's settings.

    Everything you've mentioned are simply tools. None of them are better or worse.

    Train yourself to see as a meter sees is the best method for using any system. Or get a handheld incident meter.
    In my opinion this is excellent advice.
    When tested against a standard, all my cameras and light meters give pretty much the same reading, but when pointed at a subject the readings can vary by as much as a stop.

    When I use transparency films I will usually refer to a incident light reading.

    I did note, however, that when I borrowed a friends Nikon F4 the meter readings pretty much coincided with the readings from my incident meter. This was a limited experience with this camera and I wonder if anyone else came to the same conclusion.

  5. #5
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Nikon F Photomic with the Incidence Attachment in place cannot be beat, IMO, if you must use an in-camera meter.

    I see no big advantage in cameras that have various metering patterns. It doesn't matter what your metering pattern is because it is still a reflected light meter, therefore is very sensitive to changes in composition. An incident meter only responds to changes in the over all lighting condition. This makes more sense to me. Reflected meters are fine, but you always have to be on your toes when using them, and constantly making adjustments based on what they say. You can follow an incident meter directly and have a higher rate of ideal exposures.

    If I were to pick an in-camera reflected meter that I like best, it would be the Canon F series, like the F-1 and FTb. Only the center patch meters, making it much easier to arrive at the right exposure, IMO. Averaging, evaluative, center-weighted, etc. meters are not as easy to use to meter only a section of the scene, and spot meters are small and error prone if you are not taking your time. I find the Canon 12% patch to be a good compromise.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-26-2009 at 09:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  6. #6
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Nikon F Photomic with the Incidence Attachment in place cannot be beat, IMO, if you must use an in-camera meter.
    Photomic Incidence Attachment?!!? Please expand!

    I have used various tricks (translucent white plexiglass) in front of an SLR lens in order to get incident metering, but never heard of a specific accessory.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  7. #7
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Photomic Incidence Attachment?!!? Please expand!

    I have used various tricks (translucent white plexiglass) in front of an SLR lens in order to get incident metering, but never heard of a specific accessory.
    Early versions of the Photomic head had them. The first Photomic meter did not read through the lens. It was basically an external meter that was built into the prism housing, but talked to the camera re: shutter and aperture, so you could read it in the viewfinder. The Incidence Attachment went on over the external sensor.

    The Gossen Digisix on a hot shoe mount will get you about the same sort of effect, but will not be coupled to the camera like the Nikon.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-26-2009 at 09:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #8
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    A meter is only as good as the person interpreting the information. As I tell my students, the meter measure everything as 18% gray, so if what you point your camera towards isn't 18%, then on your film it will be 18%, unless you make the proper adjustments to the camera's settings.

    Everything you've mentioned are simply tools. None of them are better or worse.

    Train yourself to see as a meter sees is the best method for using any system. Or get a handheld incident meter.
    I also fully agree: For that reason I usually prefer a spot meter (more control over exactly what's being measured), when not actually using an incident meter.

    On the other hand, the 50,000 eye-controlled sensors, individually programmed to give a perfect postcard-type exposure (as determined by company engineers) and directly linked by radon-doped Niobium-core AF motors - coupled with a scene recognition & composition algorithm - to the framing and focus servo mechanisms isn't really my cup of tea.
    I wonder why one should even bother using film if one prefers letting the camera do all the thinking...
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  9. #9
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanishing Point Ent. View Post
    In my opinion, the Canon T90 has the most advanced metering, that I've ever encountered.

    It has 3 different metering patterns; average, central 12 % area & spot 3 % area.

    It has metered manual, shutter priority, aperture priority, 7 different programs,
    ( although 2 are the same ) & 2 different stop-down metering programs.

    It has TTL & E-TTL flash metering, plus a 1/250th sec. flash synch speed.

    It only uses 4 AA batteries & it can use Lithium's.

    It's very light weight & has a very bright viewfinder.
    I vote for the Canon T 90 too, with the Olympus OM4 a close second.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 04-26-2009 at 09:17 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: error
    Ben

  10. #10
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    One of the cameras on my wish list is an OM4. It has a 2% spot meter. When using larger formats I use a spot meter and really like the control it gives (and consistent negatives). Any metering error are my own.

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