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  1. #11
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by myself View Post
    is it Wine or Vine? I'm assuming it's vine in eruope but that us northamericans just say wine? Anyone know the exact pronounciation?
    Its German so it's "vain" the e sounds as long A
    Rick

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I have always said it as 'wain' (rhyming with vain) with the normal 'w' sound, not a 'v' sound.

    But I could be wrong!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #13
    Kvistgaard's Avatar
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    the obvious answer is: Who cares?
    Sĝren

    "We are much more likely to act our way into a new way of thinking than think our way into a new way of acting." - R. Pascale

  4. #14
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    In this case, it's Wine - the man who owns the company (which also makes wireless strobe triggers, among other things) is named Wienberg.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    In this case, it's Wine - the man who owns the company (which also makes wireless strobe triggers, among other things) is named Wienberg.
    The pronunciation is "Vine", the guy's name is surely "Weinberg" (which means "vineyard" in German).

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    In this case, it's Wine
    or Whine....

  7. #17
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Wein = 'vayn' and
    Wien = 'veen'

    but... almost all english speakers I know call them both 'ween'... e.g. they pronounce Weiner 'weener'... ach du meine Güte :rolleyes:
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  8. #18

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    I say Pocketwizard. ha ha ha ha ha
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  9. #19
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralnphot View Post
    Its German so it's "vain" the e sounds as long A
    Rick
    ******
    Perhaps in some dialect. But ei in the Neuhochdeutsch I learned in school it would be pronounced with a long I== eye. As in weinen, Weihnachten, weil, etc.
    For any German speakers, imagine the consternation when my young bride asked at an apothecary shop for some rub-on salve for her "Mann" who had a "Feber" when she used a German pronunciation of the English-named product and pronounced the word for that which is called Vicks (in English), but spelled Wicks auf Deutsch.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  10. #20

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    This is how you pronounce the "ie" or "ei" combination auf Deutsch. You look at the second letter (e or i). Then you pronounce the combination as if it were the English equivalent of the second letter. It virtually always works.

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