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  1. #21

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    i have always heard it pronounced ween, like weenie ...
    by camera store sales people and people who use them alike ..

  2. #22

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    In German, a "w" is a "w", a "v" a "v".
    Only in English comic versions of a German accent does a "v" become a "w" and wice wersa.

    "Feber", John, may still be in local use in remote parts of Austria, but it's not something you need a pharmacy for.

    The "ei" is explaned perfectly by Alan.

  3. #23
    Frank Szabo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fotoguy20d View Post
    or Whine....
    Don't forget the cheese to go with the "whine".
    ...

    "Beer is proof that God wants us to be happy."

    Benjamin Franklin

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    In German, a "w" is a "w", a "v" a "v".

    The "ei" is explaned perfectly by Alan.
    One refinement on the German "w" and "v". A German "w" is generally pronounced like and English "v" and a German "v" is generally pronounced like an English "f".

    One of the beauties of German is that the pronunciation is very regular. Unlike English, if you have a German word spelled out you can almost always pronounce it correctly, assuming you have good German pronunciation.

  5. #25
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    In this case, it's Wine - the man who owns the company (which also makes wireless strobe triggers, among other things) is named Wienberg.
    *******
    But that would be weenburg
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #26
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    In German, a "w" is a "w", a "v" a "v".
    Only in English comic versions of a German accent does a "v" become a "w" and wice wersa.

    "Feber", John, may still be in local use in remote parts of Austria, but it's not something you need a pharmacy for.

    The "ei" is explaned perfectly by Alan.
    *******
    Herr Oh Geh,

    Well, about the time of the Wirtschaftswunder in Deutschland, and the advent of the VW (FauVeh) in the U.S.A., I was learning the received pronunciation of Neuhochdeutsch.

    I do not know which product they sold in your part of German-speaking Europe, but the product we saw sold and advertised was Wicks. That would be vix, just about like the way the product name is pronounced in this neck of the woods in northern Virginia.

    My poor young bride had six weeks of German before we sallied forth to Bavaria for a year. She spoke Italian, some Spanish, some French, had Latin and Ancient Greek, but not ze Cherrmen, and most certainly, not Bayrisch.
    Last edited by Anscojohn; 05-01-2009 at 11:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #27
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Just like in any language, there are different ways to say things. For example, in some parts of Germany (northern, I believe), Ich is pronounced as if it was spelled Ysh. Therefore, since it is a proper name (assuming that is the source of the name of the product...and I have no idea why else it would have such a crappy name), it really depends on how the owner pronounces his or her name. He or she may not even be German any more, but may simply be of German descent.

    If you apply by the book pronunciation to the word, here is a little shortcut for English speakers pronouncing German words. I learned it in high school German class. Whenever there is a ie or an ei in a German word, it is pronounced like the last letter in the set is pronounced in English. Therefore, if it is ei, it rhymes with the English letter I, and if it is ie, it rhymes with the English letter E.

    So, Wien (the capital of Austria) is pronounced Vēn in German. Wein (the battery company) would be pronounced Vīn in German. Same for Schneider, Leitz, Zeiss, etc.

    Personally, I halfway butcher the German pronunciation and say Wīn., since people look at me like I'm a nutcase if I pull out the German pronunciation.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 05-01-2009 at 11:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post
    One refinement on the German "w" and "v". A German "w" is generally pronounced like and English "v" and a German "v" is generally pronounced like an English "f".

    One of the beauties of German is that the pronunciation is very regular. Unlike English, if you have a German word spelled out you can almost always pronounce it correctly, assuming you have good German pronunciation.
    Well, i have probably heard millions of Germans speak German (hear it everyday. Why, even when writing these replies i hear German "w"s being pronounced as "w"s, "v"s as "v"s!), and never was a "w" pronounced as "v".
    Nor an "v" quite as an "f", for that matter.
    Last edited by Q.G.; 05-02-2009 at 03:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    Well, about the time of the Wirtschaftswunder in Deutschland, and the advent of the VW (FauVeh) in the U.S.A., I was learning the received pronunciation of Neuhochdeutsch.
    The joke must have been on you.
    "FauVeh" is not the received nor correct pronunciation.

    The thing i was alluding to re pharmacy and all that was not the rub on or inhale stuff, but the february you were needing the thing for.

    But speaking of Wicks, it is indeed pronounced with a "W" in Germany.
    Just like the less sociable German word "Wickser"*.
    Which is even less sociable than a "fixer" (in pharmacy and all that context).


    *(For those of you guessing: "Wickser" shares a few letters with an English word of the same meaning. Those letters, in the right order, are "w", "k" and "er".
    And no, it is not someone using "Wicks".)

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Personally, I halfway butcher the German pronunciation and say Wīn., since people look at me like I'm a nutcase if I pull out the German pronunciation.
    There's a clue in there ...

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