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  1. #21
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    I say bite the bullet and go streight to the F100! From what I understand (I wish I could say I was the proud owner of one...) you will not regret it!
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #22

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    I've got an F100 and would not be without it. I owned an F5 a few years ago and loved the output but not the weight of it. The F100, in my opinion, is about the best film body with a built-in winder you'll get without going for an F5, F6 or EOS1.

    The metering is superb, it's incredibly reliable, it's solid and people will always want them as they are so good. The only criticism I've ever heard levelled against them is that, on the early ones, the prongs on the film rewind are made of plastic and were prone to snapping. However, later ones (where the ends of the prongs are square) are much stronger. If you are careful how you load and unload film, that shouldn't be a problem.
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  3. #23
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jenkin View Post
    I've got an F100 and would not be without it. I owned an F5 a few years ago and loved the output but not the weight of it. The F100, in my opinion, is about the best film body with a built-in winder you'll get without going for an F5, F6 or EOS1.

    The metering is superb, it's incredibly reliable, it's solid and people will always want them as they are so good. The only criticism I've ever heard levelled against them is that, on the early ones, the prongs on the film rewind are made of plastic and were prone to snapping. However, later ones (where the ends of the prongs are square) are much stronger. If you are careful how you load and unload film, that shouldn't be a problem.
    In camera store after camera store [In Los Angeles: Bel Air and Samys, for example], most of the sales and repair people that I talk to say that they think the F-100 is the best 35mm slr that Nikon made.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #24

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    Thanks for all the advice. Now I have no choice but to move up to the F100.

    By the way, I noticed today that the "Imported" Nikon F6 is now listed by BH Photo at $2,399. I'm almost certain I saw it listed for $1,999 by BH Photo several months ago. Could the price increase be due to increasing demand for film cameras? :o

  5. #25

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    No, the F6 price increase is simply due to currency issues. Nikon figures that the folks that presently are in the market for an F6 have more money than sense anyways, and don't bother with anything as mundane as cost/benefit calculations, and their demand is price inelastic - they just want it, and damn the cost.

  6. #26

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    N90 imo, but I am hoping to get an f100 or f5 soon for more stationary work.

  7. #27
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    I bought a new F80 soon after they came out, and recently bought a used F100 advertised here. I kept the F80 because it's smaller and lighter and has a built-in flash (and it does have a spot meter). It's a great packing-around camera. The F100 is bigger, heavier, has faster and better autofocus and accepts all of the AIS lenses that I bought for my FM3A. I could easily get by with just the F100, but selling the F80 would be like selling my dog - in both cases we're used to each other. One other thing I really appreciate about the F100 is that it takes regular AA batteries, not those ridiculously expensive batteries the F80 uses.
    The battery problem with the N80 can be solved with the optional battery pack. This lets it use 4 AA size batteries and it really doesn't feel too much heavier.

    I have the N80 and F100. The advantage of the N80 is the light weight and pop up flash. The F100 is heavier, better built, and faster though. I paid full retail price (about $700.00 or $800.00) for it a couple of years ago because I thought it was going to be discontinued. I have only shot about 5 or 6 rolls of film with it. I stored it away not because I didn't like it but because the film labs in my area are pittifull. I also stored my F, FTN Photomic, F3HP, FM2N, S2 Rangefinder, and my Mamiya medium format equipment as well.

    p.s. If you plan on purchasing a used F100, check the mechanism where the film canister goes (the little spool). I believe that older F100's had an issue with that part and were later replaced with a sturdier part.

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