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  1. #11
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    Yes. The spot meter goes where the spot meter goes, and my 18% grey may not be in the middle of the image.
    There's a new-fangled gadget built into most modern cameras called AE-lock...

    Couldn't imagine using auto exposure without it!
    ;-)
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  2. #12

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    I couldn't imagine using auto exposure without using the "off", or ",manual" gadget.
    Makes live much easier. And produces better results.

  3. #13
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    I couldn't imagine using auto exposure without using the "off", or ",manual" gadget.
    Makes live much easier. And produces better results.
    I find myself in the rather surprising, odd & awkward position of actually defending auto exposure....

    How is using AE with AE-lock different from manual (at least in the most cases)?
    (Not counting external hand-held meters, very long exposures, odd filter use and so on)
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  4. #14
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    The compounding factor that led to the blunder, is that this camera has an "off" switch. In my mind, when I turned the camera off and put it on the shelf, when I picked it up weeks later and turned it on, there would be no reason to assume the exposure compensation was still on from before.

    I don't see how the autoexposure matters. If it had been a manual camera, I would still have set exposure compensation, or I wouldn't be able to use most in-camera meters satisfactorily.

  5. #15
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    The compounding factor that led to the blunder, is that this camera has an "off" switch. In my mind, when I turned the camera off and put it on the shelf, when I picked it up weeks later and turned it on, there would be no reason to assume the exposure compensation was still on from before.

    I don't see how the autoexposure matters. If it had been a manual camera, I would still have set exposure compensation, or I wouldn't be able to use most in-camera meters satisfactorily.
    I suppose my own take is that, when manual metering is easily accessible and auto- has a practical AE-lock, there is little reason to use exposure compensation.

    While it may be useful to *trick* the camera beyond it's accepted ISO range or in other special situations, I've always avoided using it exactly for the reason cited by the OP: Too great a risk of forgetting that it is set.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  6. #16

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    Indeed.

    There are two ways to compensate.

    One is to take a reading, and then adjust the aperture and/or shutterspeed according to what you want.

    The other is to tell the camera to correct what it does to either aperture or shutterspeed (or both).

    No need for a correction dial, switch or button when you do not let the camera set aperture and/or shutterspeed.
    So no opportunity to forget about any correction you might have set when you're not using auto-modes.

    So, Bettersense, autoexposure does matter.

    And, Rollei Nut, that's the difference between manual and AE, even with AE lock.


    By the way, if light levels are beyond the range of what a meter can meter, setting another ISO will not be of help. It can neither change light levels nor adjust the sensitivity of the meter.
    But yes, you can point the meter to a brighter bit in the scene, and guess how much that needs to be corrected to get the important bit you could not meter properly exposed. So i guess it is a useful "trick".
    Last edited by Q.G.; 05-12-2009 at 04:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    I find myself in the rather surprising, odd & awkward position of actually defending auto exposure....

    How is using AE with AE-lock different from manual (at least in the most cases)?
    (Not counting external hand-held meters, very long exposures, odd filter use and so on)
    Looking at your list of equipment reminds me of the good old days when I had a couple of SL35E's. One of my favorite features of the camera was that the AE lock was built in to the shutter release button. It was the first camera I had owned that was so easy to use in auto exposure. I was in the habit when using manual metering cameras of finding a "medium gray reflectance" area in the scene, and taking my reading from that. With the SL35E, it was so simple to do that: just aim at the area to be metered, press the shutter release gently, recompose, and shoot. A wonderful, and very ergonomic, camera with great Zeiss lenses!
    Eddy McDonald
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    Eschew defenestration!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I don't see how the autoexposure matters. If it had been a manual camera, I would still have set exposure compensation, or I wouldn't be able to use most in-camera meters satisfactorily.
    Don't understand why not. Maybe it's just that we have different ways of shooting, but I have never used the exposure compensation switches of either auto or manual cameras. With manual metering, you just meter the area you want to read from, then open or close the aperture as much as you want to. You compensate with your fingers, by adjusting the aperture or shutter speed.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  9. #19
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    Looking at your list of equipment reminds me of the good old days when I had a couple of SL35E's. One of my favorite features of the camera was that the AE lock was built in to the shutter release button... A wonderful, and very ergonomic, camera with great Zeiss lenses!
    Yikes! I though I was alone on the planet to appreciate the SL35-E (Despite sits various shortcomings)!

    Nice to hear from another Rollei veteran...
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    Q.C.: I still don't get your point (is there one?)
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  10. #20
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    Don't understand why not. Maybe it's just that we have different ways of shooting, but I have never used the exposure compensation switches of either auto or manual cameras. With manual metering, you just meter the area you want to read from, then open or close the aperture as much as you want to. You compensate with your fingers, by adjusting the aperture or shutter speed.
    On my Pentax cameras, the manual meter tells you you are over or under, but not by how much. A pretty bad meter. On my Olympus camera, the manual meter will not go to + or - 2 stops. Only one stop in either direction is visible. So if you know you need -2 stops because of a spotlit performer, you have to meter each shot, then adjust 2 stops in the right direction. So why not just dial in the 2 stops to start with? If I didn't have exposure compensation, I would adjust the film speed up, so that I could meter normally without going through gyrations in order to meter, then correct every shot. So even with a manual exposure method, I would be using exposure compensation.

    Now, the Nikon in question does have an electronical sliding meter thing. You could easily just meter everything at -2 with this particular camera, it's true.

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