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  1. #21
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    On my Pentax cameras, the manual meter tells you you are over or under, but not by how much. A pretty bad meter. On my Olympus camera, the manual meter will not go to + or - 2 stops. Only one stop in either direction is visible. So if you know you need -2 stops because of a spotlit performer, you have to meter each shot, then adjust 2 stops in the right direction. So why not just dial in the 2 stops to start with? If I didn't have exposure compensation, I would adjust the film speed up, so that I could meter normally without going through gyrations in order to meter, then correct every shot. So even with a manual exposure method, I would be using exposure compensation.

    Now, the Nikon in question does have an electronical sliding meter thing. You could easily just meter everything at -2 with this particular camera, it's true.
    Doesn't the lens aperture ring (and shutter speed knob) have click stops? I just count clicks.

    Again, we each have our favorite ways of working, but I find having to figure out which way to turn an exposure comp dial too much to think about whilst shooting. Turning an aperture ring, on the other hand, is second nature, especially when I just take the reading off the area that I want to be gray, and shoot.

    But I guess that's why the camera manufacturers make cameras that work for both of us!
    Eddy McDonald
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  2. #22
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    So if you know you need -2 stops because of a spotlit performer, you have to meter each shot, then adjust 2 stops in the right direction. So why not just dial in the 2 stops to start with? If I didn't have exposure compensation, I would adjust the film speed up, so that I could meter normally without going through gyrations in order to meter, then correct every shot. So even with a manual exposure method, I would be using exposure compensation.
    How do you know you need -2 stops compensation? Is that with every lens (i.e. metering coverage)?

    I've never used exposure compensation.
    For theatrical/concert shots, I've incident metered the stage lights beforehand (when possible), spot metered them (also when possible), or compensated the exposure manually (counting diaphragm clicks or speed clicks).
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Q.C.: I still don't get your point (is there one?)
    Absolutely.
    The moment you happen to find a camera with an Auto-mode in your hands, switch the auto-thingy off.
    This woudn't have happened if the OP had done that.

  4. #24
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Absolutely.
    The moment you happen to find a camera with an Auto-mode in your hands, switch the auto-thingy off.
    This woudn't have happened if the OP had done that.
    Yes, but if you know what you're doing, auto + AE lock is the same as manual (usual caveats apply)....
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    How do you know you need -2 stops compensation? Is that with every lens (i.e. metering coverage)?

    I've never used exposure compensation.
    For theatrical/concert shots, I've incident metered the stage lights beforehand (when possible), spot metered them (also when possible), or compensated the exposure manually (counting diaphragm clicks or speed clicks).
    But how did you know how much you needed to compensate .. ?

    Rings a bell?

    Now how, if you "compensated the exposure manually", can you "never [have] used exposure compensation"?

    But i know what you mean: you've never told the camera to change what it does. (That is, you have, but only by using the AE lock, and perhaps not by using a compensation dial).
    That's the thing i tried to explain earlier. There is an easy way that does not lead to problems, and another way that does.
    Do the first ('compensate' when setting aperture or shutterspeed manually), and not use the button/switch/knob/dial (i.e. not need to because you must correct what you let the camera do), and it would never have happened.
    Last edited by Q.G.; 05-12-2009 at 05:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Yes, but if you know what you're doing, auto + AE lock is the same as manual (usual caveats apply)....
    No, no.
    The result may be the same. As far as the exposure is concerned.
    But not as far as the camera, and dials that may or may not have been left in an undesired setting is concerned.

    Unless you forget not to apply the 'compensation' manually when it is no longer needed (a difficult thing to do), you will never run into this problem when you use a camera in manual mode.
    But in AE, there is always the chance.

    AE lock sounds good, yes. If used as a one-shot compensation.
    But it will not work when the thing you want properly exposed is lit below (or beyond) what your meter can deal with.
    Then the only AE thing you can do is use that dial thingy.

  7. #27
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    But how did you know how much you needed to compensate .. ?

    Rings a bell?

    Now how, if you "compensated the exposure manually", can you "never [have] used exposure compensation"?
    Errrr... Most of my friends, er.. Cameras are actually 100% manual exposure (sorry for the shockingly politically incorrect statement).

    But when I decide what "grey" is, whether I rotate a dial or use AE-lock makes no difference.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    Errrr... Most of my friends, er.. Cameras are actually 100% manual exposure (sorry for the shockingly politically incorrect statement).

    But if you "compensated the exposure manually", how can you "never [have] used exposure compensation"?

    (You're thinking about the latter as a feature of automatic cameras, and not as the thing it actually does.
    That's quite o.k., since as a feature of automatic cameras, it leads to problems like forgetting you have it set. That's why automatic or not matters.
    But see it as one and the same, i.e. look at what it does, and you'll see that you do not need the feature, and thus also not the opportunity to forget you have it set.
    That's the point i was trying to make.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    But when I decide what "grey" is, whether I rotate a dial or use AE-lock makes no difference.
    Indeed. See my post following the one your reply was in reply to.

  9. #29
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    How do you know you need -2 stops compensation? Is that with every lens (i.e. metering coverage)?
    Because at the last event, you shot at -1 stops compensation, and the slides all came out overexposed. In my case, you only have one lens.

  10. #30
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    I use exposure compensation regularly (although not always) - when I use auto exposure.

    I use auto exposure:

    1) when the light is changeable;
    2) when I am dealing with a rapidly changing scene; and
    3) when I use OTF flash metering.

    Otherwise, I meter manually, and adjust according to best judgment.

    Matt

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