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  1. #1
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Whats the E. F. and G. mean in Olympus Zuiko lenses?

    Whats the E. F. and G. mean in Olympus Zuiko lenses?

  2. #2

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    As i remember, the number of elements (A = 1, B = 2, etc.).
    Could be wrong though.

  3. #3

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    Hi,

    This was the nomenclature used on the early (typically so-called silver-nosed) series of OM lenses, produced in the seventies. The letter simply indicates the number of glass elements used in the lens construction, e.g.

    • E = 5 elements
    • F = 6 elements
    • G = 7 elements


    The later series of lenses (often with minor or no optical changes apart from better multicoating of the elements, and without the chrome front rings) dropped this nomenclature.

    P.S. Olympus enthusiasts often prefer the earlier silver-nosed lenses because they have lower contrast, making them better suited for black and white photography (to retain shadow details better).

  4. #4
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info!

  5. #5
    Ken N's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philosomatographer View Post
    Hi,
    P.S. Olympus enthusiasts often prefer the earlier silver-nosed lenses because they have lower contrast, making them better suited for black and white photography (to retain shadow details better).
    I also find them to be an advantage when shooting Velvia for the same reasons. Nearly all of my Zuikos are of the silver-nosed version. When given a choice, though, take the latest version of the 24/2.8 and the 50s for flare control.

    AG Schnozz
    http://www.zone-10.com

    When you turn your camera on, does it return the favor?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken N View Post
    I also find them to be an advantage when shooting Velvia for the same reasons. Nearly all of my Zuikos are of the silver-nosed version. When given a choice, though, take the latest version of the 24/2.8 and the 50s for flare control.

    AG Schnozz
    Hi Ken,

    It's probably for the same reason. Velvia always seems punchier and more contrasty than most slide film and the slightly reduced contrast might just be helping to avoid blocked-out shadows.

    I have a 50/f1.4 in both silver and black nose varieties - so I'll check and see if it does make a difference when I next have a roll of Velvia in my OM's.

    Paul.
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)



 

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