Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,336   Posts: 1,537,568   Online: 1103
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 34
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    I attended a Kodak stockholders meeting in 1974 as a high school senior (I did not own any stock, it was an educational experience), and the very same question was asked of the CEO at the time. "Why doesn't Kodak make any good 35 mm cameras?"

    The answer was like this. At the time Kodak was selling around 90% of all cameras bought in the US. The vast majority of photographers in American were happy with the basic box camera Kodak always sold. The CEO said it wasn't cost efficient to go after the last 10% of the market, and would raise issues about 'monopoly' from Federal regulators.

    That's the word from Kodak's CEO in 1974.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    360
    Images
    5
    Don't forget, for a while kodak had other divisions making cameras as well, like Graflex, which was one of the most popular cameras out there for a while, with every size imaginable.

  3. #13
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Retina Reflex S and III.

    Steve.

    *****
    I think O.P. meant SLRs made in U.S.A. I am led to believe the Retina was made at the old Nagel Werke in Stuttgart which Eastman bought in the 1920s.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  4. #14
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,592
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    *****
    I think O.P. meant SLRs made in U.S.A. I am led to believe the Retina was made at the old Nagel Werke in Stuttgart which Eastman bought in the 1920s.
    They were, but the OP only said made by Kodak, not specifically Kodak US.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #15
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    They were, but the OP only said made by Kodak, not specifically Kodak US.


    Steve.
    *****
    Yes. And with all due respect to P.E., I think if those mechanical engineers designing cameras over in the other building at Rochester, USA had been given a chance to design an SLR, it would have been a disaster like the Ektra (of 1940?); the professional Medalist 6 x 9 which used 620 film; or the Signet 35, with a very good Tessar-formula lens, a good rangefinder, but with separate shutter cocking, a limited-range of shutter speeds, and ergonomics that left everything to be desired. BTW, anyone wanna buy a Signet 35?
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #16
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,862
    True, I didn't say Kodak US. But what got me thinking about the whole thing was looking at an old Kodak 8mm projector and seeing it emblazoned with MADE IN USA all over. Plus Officer Mandrake's line in Dr. Strangelove:

    General Jack D. Ripper: No, I mean when [the Japanese] tortured you did you talk?
    Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Ah, oh, no... well, I don't think they wanted me to talk really. I don't think they wanted me to say anything. It was just their way of having a bit of fun, the swines. Strange thing is they make such bloody good cameras.
    This is a movie from the '60s I believe...it was only going to get worse (or better?). I don't know if the Spotmatic even around in 1964 yet.
    Last edited by BetterSense; 05-13-2009 at 08:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,253
    Images
    148
    By 1960 the Minolta SR-1's, Nikon F's etc were making a huge impact. The Spotmatic is 64 and was the 2nd camera with TTL metering, the first was the Praktikamat. In Europe Fuji was already beginning to eat into Kodaks colour film market too.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 05-13-2009 at 08:05 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Huntington, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    305
    One of my first cameras was a Retina Reflex IV. Made in Germany, kinda klunky by todays standards. No auto return mirror (mirror resets when shutter was wound), external metering cell, leaf shutter for flash sync at all speeds. Before that they made the Kodak Ektra which is a real collectors item now. John, www.zuiko.com

  9. #19
    Lopaka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    758
    Kodak's business model has always been designed for mass marketing. They have not had a lot of success with lower volume pro level stuff. Back in the 1950's, they decided to get out of the view camera business, sold it to a mail order house in Chicago - and Calumet Photographic was born.

    Bob
    Last edited by Lopaka; 05-13-2009 at 08:33 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: fumble fingers
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    588
    Here's the list of Kodak cameras . . .

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu.../aa13/aa13.pdf
    Last edited by DannL; 05-13-2009 at 10:57 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin