Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,688   Posts: 1,548,655   Online: 1197
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 34 of 34
  1. #31
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,458
    Images
    60
    BetterSense:

    I think you had to be there.

    The market for 35mm SLRs took off in a way that was probably surprising to many in the photographic industry. Starting in the mid to late 1960s, and then accelerating through the 1970s, 35mm SLRs went from being tools for specialists to being incredibly popular mainstream cameras.

    Kodak was servicing that market with greatly expanded film and photofinishing products. At the same time, Kodak was manufacturing a large quantity of cameras that were aimed at a less sophisticated market, but not necessarily an inexpensive market. Kodak sold tens of millions of 126 ad 110 cameras, for instance, and some of them were quite advanced.

    We tend to think of SLRs or advanced rangefinders as being the most important part of the photographic industry. For Kodak, the film part of the 35mm equation was very important, but cameras, not as much.

    Matt

  2. #32
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,149
    Matt,

    Well said.

    It took a lot of crappy snapshots from the 30's to present to finance the research and develop the film advances that we have today. In the 60's, a friend and I worked one summer at EJ Korvette near Rockville Maryland. We would work eight hour shifts ringing up Instamatic 104's and Instamatic film all day. We were so busy that we did not take any breaks but lunch breaks.

    There were probably only a few of those Instamatics that got serious photographers started, but the sales volume provided a lot of jobs in Rochester New York. The money was in the film and processing for Kodak.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    16,412
    Blog Entries
    2
    i wish they would re-introduce the medalist series cameras but for 120 film.

  4. #34
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    [ In the 60's, a friend and I worked one summer at EJ Korvette near Rockville Maryland. We would work eight hour shifts ringing up Instamatic 104's and Instamatic film all day. We were so busy that we did not take any breaks but lunch breaks.

    ******
    That would have been about 1964. Where was the retail clerk's union with you guys working without breaks? Even with a summer job, they made you join. At least they did at the EJK store I worked at in suburban Philadelphia, PA at the time. BTW, that's the same store where I bought my Weston Master V exposure meter. $19.95, iirc.

    104 advertising copy said something like "Take pictues like this with your Instamatic 104." Illustrations were shot with a Blad, I was told years later. The Instamatic 500 was made at the German factory; had a Xenar lens, iirc, compur shutter, and selenium auto exposure by Gossen.
    The drop-in loading of the Instamatic (not to be confused with a self-developing system) really did help to bring on a new surge in consumer-photography because it eliminated all the loading problems amateurs had loading roll film cameras.
    EK also got to be able to sell all new equipment to all photofinishers


    Steve[/QUOTE]
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin