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  1. #11
    Edimilson's Avatar
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    I have a Bessa R3A along with a set of Voigtländer lenses (90 mm Lanthar, 50 mm Nokton and 21 mm Color Skopar). I absolutely love using it and have had good results (some examples here). Of course my results are pretty modest in comparison with what so many guys here accomplish.
    I also find the camera extremely beautiful with the 50 mm on. There are a few things I dislike though:
    1) Sometimes it's hard to see what's displayed on the viewfinder;
    2) The meter only works after you advance the film. I find that bad. If I advance the film and find out there isn't enough light, I either have to keep the camera like that or make the shot anyway so as not to keep the camera "cocked" (hope I've made myself clear. I am not a native speaker of English).
    3) It's louder than I expected, but then again it's not a Leica, which people say can be very silent.

  2. #12
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by denmark.yuzon View Post
    im not closing my doors on a Leica M3.. but, Im a bit concerned with the bottom loading, it may take a while for me to get used to it, and since i go out a lot, i may find myself always looking for a place to sit to cut my films and load it
    No need to cut your film leader with a Leica M.

    The M3 is a bit slower to load than what I'm used to (M6) because of the design of the take-up spool.
    In my case, bottom loading is really no problem, except very occasionally dealing with the detached bottom plate can be awkward (like hanging on a harness over a cliff, where you really don't want to drop it). The bottom loading itself I find easier than many SLRs.
    Most experienced M users will say it's not a big issue, or not one at all..
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  3. #13
    lns
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhanc View Post
    ...
    edit: I shoot mostly B&W using 28, 50 & 85mm focal lengths and value sharpness and contrast as photographic qualities
    Is there a Voigtlander with framelines for all those lenses? Offhand, I know the Leica M6 (which you can get used for $1,000 to $1,200) works. The Zeiss Ikon also has the proper framelines. The Leica M4-P is another option, albeit meterless.

    Nothing wrong with a Voigtlander camera. I'm just not sure they have the framelines you are seeking. You can always use an external viewfinder for the 28mm, but not everyone likes those. And if you're willing to use an external viewfinder, I'd consider a used M2 or M3.

    -Laura

  4. #14
    mhanc's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for the feedback and ideas - very helpful. Perhaps used Leica is the way to go for not too much additional cost - well, about 2x the cost, anyway. Can always sell and recover most if not all of the cost. [Prices of used gear seem to have been increasing over the past 3 month or so.]

    Perhaps not for me but just curious in general as to thoughts on the old Nikon rangefinders.

  5. #15

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    My experience with Voigtlander was mixed, and I eventually gave up on the brand. I had a 28/1.9 that was very poor wide open, and developed a mechanical problem as well. The rangefinder on my Bessa T is out of alignment and can't be adjusted to be accurate at range and close at the same time. The 50/3.5 collapsible Heliar, however, was mechanically and optically a gem.

  6. #16

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    Old Nikon rangefinders are fine. To my mind they're a little odd but many people love them.
    The back comes off for loading & is somewhat easier than the Leicas. The focus is done either by using the focus ring or the little wheel near the shutter release ala Contax.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #17
    fotch's Avatar
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    The old Voigtländers were German made and had a level of quality and precision not matched by the current Voigtländers. That doesn’t mean anything bad, just that a Cosina is a Cosina, regardless of what name they put on it. Now, for being a Cosina, is sounds like a nice camera, for what it is. A Leica is a Leica, not an imitation or reborn cheaply made camera. You get a level of quality and precision that is becoming less common in products made today. Picture quality has more to do with the photographer than anything else. That said, if you need real durability or just like well made precision devices, you obtain the real thing. Value wise (not initial cost) I think a used Lecia with a quality CLA by Sherry or Dag, will return more than enough resale value as the years roll by than the current rebirth of old camera brands made by Cosina. I understand the concept of using a famous name to sell product, (example: shoes ) so my comments are not to fault Cosina, rather, to draw a real comparison of two products and the logic of buying one over the other. JMHO
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #18
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    Voigtlander Bessa's are outstanding values and I have owned a couple of them. But I decided to use a Nikon FM3a instead. Built much more sturdy than the Bessa's; better view for all lenses, aperture preferred plus real manual, and lenses are cheaper. Negatives are shutter noise. What else? I do not know.
    Akiva S.

    Nikkormat FTN, Nikon F, Nikon FE, Leica M3

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  9. #19

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    If you just want to try out a Voigtlander camera let me attempt to talk you into getting a Voigtlander Vito II folder (ca. 195x) that has been CLA'ed. These camera's are a jewel. Being a folder, it will have a fixed lens (in this case a 50mm f/3.5 Tessar) which means you won't be tempted to buy new lenses for it. The Vito II is very compact compared to a Leica or Bessa and folded up, it fits in the palm of your hand. This means you can take it to places you wouldn't even take a Leica. I normally carry a M6TTL but have found the Vito II to be useful and fun. It's hard to pin-point, but I would characterize it as a gentleman's camera; one that you could carry to a black-tie event and not feel out of place.

    The Vito II is meterless, so it lends itself to a film with exposure latitude like Tri-X, as well as the speed needed to support indoor photography; the natural stomping ground of a gentleman.

    Denis K

  10. #20
    Jeff L's Avatar
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    I like my R2C alot. Built in meter and framelines. I use it along side my Contax RF's- actually I use it more. Voigt 21mm is nice too.
    Jeff

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