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  1. #1
    pao_alfonso's Avatar
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    How to use macro function on a zoom lens?

    Hello guys! I'm a film photography noob, and have only been recently introduced to it by a friend. I wanted to try out macro photography so my husband bought me a 75-300mm mc vivitar zoom lens. I wonder if anybody can help me out with using it for macro photography?
    My Manila - Adventures in Photography

  2. #2
    eddym's Avatar
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    Uh... what do you want to know?
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  3. #3
    pao_alfonso's Avatar
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    how do you effectively use it? like how far do you have to be from the object? what kind of lighting conditions would be most effective? there's a part on the lens that says "macro" when you twist it, what is that for?
    My Manila - Adventures in Photography

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It's worth pointing out that the macro function of a zoom lens isn't the highest quality but it's a good place to start. Your best bet is to go to your local library and see what books they have on Macro photography. You may need to use a tripod as depth of field is very shallow, and look at stopping the lens down to around f11/f16.

    Later if you feel the need you can buy a specialist Macro lens.

    Ian

  5. #5
    pao_alfonso's Avatar
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    okay, thanks for the input
    My Manila - Adventures in Photography

  6. #6
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Actually, you might try opening wide out. f4 or so. This will further reduce your depth of focus and thereby further isolating your subject matter. Also allows faster shutter speeds to further reduce movement. And as Ian suggests, definitely invest in a tripod. If you can find one cheap enough, get one with a reverseable mast so you can mount the camera upside down, closer to the ground and closer to your subject. If you shutter speed gets below 1/125th you will probably also need a shutter release mechanism (cable, remote, et al.). What kind of camera do you have?
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #7
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Basically, you put the lens in the 'macro' position, get close to your subject and look through the viewfinder. Move the camera back and forth until the image is sharp. As Ian said, you will probably need a tripod, and I would recommend a focusing rack. That said, I have done a lot of macro photos hand held if the light is good and you don't get too close. You can 'chase' insects this way. Just try it and have fun! If you get a couple of good ones per roll that's good.
    Bruce

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    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  8. #8
    pao_alfonso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdunek View Post
    Basically, you put the lens in the 'macro' position, get close to your subject and look through the viewfinder. Move the camera back and forth until the image is sharp. As Ian said, you will probably need a tripod, and I would recommend a focusing rack. That said, I have done a lot of macro photos hand held if the light is good and you don't get too close. You can 'chase' insects this way. Just try it and have fun! If you get a couple of good ones per roll that's good.
    okay, that makes sense. i will try that tomorrow. thank you everybody for your helpful inputs.
    My Manila - Adventures in Photography

  9. #9
    pao_alfonso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Actually, you might try opening wide out. f4 or so. This will further reduce your depth of focus and thereby further isolating your subject matter. Also allows faster shutter speeds to further reduce movement. And as Ian suggests, definitely invest in a tripod. If you can find one cheap enough, get one with a reverseable mast so you can mount the camera upside down, closer to the ground and closer to your subject. If you shutter speed gets below 1/125th you will probably also need a shutter release mechanism (cable, remote, et al.). What kind of camera do you have?
    I use a Yashica FX-3, Chris. boy, have i got a lot to learn.
    My Manila - Adventures in Photography

  10. #10
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    That's alright. I made the same 'get out your crystal balls' mistake a couple of weeks ago. We never learn. Welcome to APUG.
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti



 

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