Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,548   Posts: 1,544,568   Online: 1001
      
Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 68
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,308
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    50
    i dunno, somewhere between 35 + 50mm but
    i think you need 2 lenses, not one, we see in stereo, don't we ?
    http://www.pauck.de/marco/photo/ster...k/sputnik.html

  2. #52
    Troy Hamon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Alaska
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    291
    I agree with the rather extensive discussions about ways of deciding what a 'normal' perspective is from the erudite to the tongue in cheek. I haven't seen what is usually described as the optical standard answer. The size of the image that you are working with is the critical question. The 'normal' lens is supposed to be the diagonal distance from one corner of the film to the far corner. This is the hypotenuse of the right triangle...which for a 35 mm frame (36x24) works out to 43 mm. For whatever that's worth.

    Far better answers were given by Pierre and Thilo, among others, way back on the first page. My answer may have been what you thought you were looking for originally, but as so many others have said, it is a totally subjective question that some people a long time ago developed a standard (but not necessarily right) answer to.

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    540
    Hi there,

    The easiest way to find this is to mount a 58mm on a 35mm camera, hold it vertical and focus with both eyes open. That's why most camera companies offered 58 - 60mm premium lenses when 35mm first became popular.

    Just a thought.

  4. #54
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I'd like to find a "Beer Goggle" lens that sees the world from the perspective a guy who is sitting in a bar at 2:00 in the morning after a full night of drinking copious amounts of beer. Every woman looks like a super-model.
    I thought that's what a Holga was.



    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  5. #55
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    I thought that's what a Holga was.
    Michael
    Sure, it gives you the visual distortion but where's the inflated false sense of self-esteem?
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #56

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Quote Originally Posted by phfitz
    The easiest way to find this is to mount a 58mm on a 35mm camera, hold it vertical and focus with both eyes open.
    If you're suggesting you try to match the image size in the viewfinder with what you see directly, the trouble is that it depends on the viewfinder's magnification (or put another way, the apparent size of the viewfinder image). If you try the test with two different cameras, you can get two different results.

  7. #57
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    Sure, it gives you the visual distortion but where's the inflated false sense of self-esteem?
    A holga with a Leica logo on it?

    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #58
    Sparky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,100

    a different take?

    Well, having read through most of the responses - and finding the question a bit 'lacking' in definition... I suspect that the question isn't referring to 'perspective' which is identical in all lenses regardless of focal length, but rather 'angle of view'. I don't know about YOU guys - but from what I can tell with my own vision - my angle of view is significantly greater than 140º. Actually it's about 180º in the horizontal and about 120-130º in the vertical. So - I would HAVE to venture that something like a zeiss hologon would best match it. Though I don't know what their focal length is off hand. From the way I understand matters of human vision we tend to see this really large angle of view but the brain limits what part of this visual field we pay attention to. And I think this is completely variable in different individuals and at different times depending on what we're paying attention to. I'm not trying to be 'difficult' or part with the masses in any way - it just seems obvious (??) to me... that's my 2 cents. Maybe I'm just not understanding the question.

  9. #59

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    368
    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    I know this is a silly, elementary question but I have to settle a bet.

    What lens in 35mm format, gives a perspective closest to the human eye?
    Is it a 50mm lens, 35mm lens or something else?
    It's the 35mm lens. As we go throught life, our eyes aren't fixed straight ahead. They wander from side to side. Very similar to the 35mm field of view.

    Kiron Kid

  10. #60
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    I would suggest that human perception, not optical characteristics are the question here. The focal lengths assigned to "Normal" lenses have been chosen for optical reasons: A focal length equal to the diagonal of the film frame results in the most efficient optical design, as far as maximum and minimum aperture ... and a number of others.

    How we PERCEIVE the object, is not directly related to comfortable design. There is a reason 100-180mm lenses are used for portraiture in medium format - the perceived "ballooning effect of shorter lenes is especially annoying in portraiture. We are MOST sensitive to familiar physical appearances, and therefore facial perspective.

    But - don't take my word for it, Try a portrait with a "short - wide angle" - lens and see what you think.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin