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  1. #11
    Jesper's Avatar
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    Would anyone try to return a lottery ticket because there was no prize on it?

    If I want a working camera with everything guaranteed, I buy a new one (and I will have to pay for it)
    If I feel like taking a chance on a nice looking camera for a fiver, I buy at a thrift store. If it doens't work at least my money may be doing something good. Buying from a thrift store is a kind of lottery. If you are not prepared to go back the next day and pay more because the camera you bought cheap really was worth more, then you shouldn' go back becuase it was worth less than the fiver you paid for it.

    Try to be a bit more positive. You bought two cameras and one of them could from what I understand easily be fixed. Isn't this one worth what you paid for the two that you bought?
    Thrift stores are not out there to cheat us. There are no people giggling with schadenfreude at the thought of someone buying the dud they planted on the shelfs.
    It is a lottery. You win some and you loose some. In any case your money helps a good cause.

  2. #12

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    Besides cameras, there are TV sets, stereos, etc., that might be in not very good working order, so you take your chances.

    Jeff
    Last edited by Jeff Kubach; 08-20-2009 at 12:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    The assumption is that people have knowledge about cameras when they give them to a charity. In fact, I would believe that most people don't have knowledge about a camera. Most items that are given to charity are one step above the trash bin, and if people knew how much value they had, they probably would sell them.

    I believe that it is often the son, wife, sister, in-law or an heir who brings things to a charity, because they might be usable without actually knowing whether they work. I don't think there is an attempt to deceive.

    For example, if I were to look through women's handbags at my local thrift shop, I wouldn't know the difference between a $5 bag and a $5,000 bag and whether it was a knockoff or authentic.

  4. #14

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    They just don't know man. Your talking about college kids and a summer job, not a camera store.

    Your luckier then then 'ALittleBitofLuck'.

    I once had a major camera shop try to sell me a broken camera and then gave me a hard time when I tried to take it back. I won't name names but it is located in Stamford Connecticut.

    Ahhh my one hundred and eleventh posteth.
    Last edited by WolfTales; 08-20-2009 at 10:16 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I brake for fixer!

  5. #15

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    You don't really expect cameras in full working order found at a thrift shop, do you. Thrift shops are weigh stations between the original owner and the garbage dump. You can get fully overhauled, warranted cameras from dealers and repair shops who do the rebuilding. John

  6. #16
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Thrift stores carry so many items, they don't have the resources to test cameras or be knowledgeable about them. Someone on another internet forum could be saying "I bought a watch at the thrift store but it doesn't work. Why don't they test these things??"

    Sometimes you can get gems at places like that, sometimes you can't.

    Trip 35s are pretty easy to repair. I wonder how much that broken one was ...

  7. #17
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    The practice in the UK for most charity shops is for goods offered to be sent to a central warehouse where they can be sorted and evaluated, and re-distributed to shops as appropriate, and as a result one is less likely to come across an unknown Modigliani from the clearance of Great Aunt Matilda's attic unwittingly priced at £12.50. I have periodic clear-outs at home, and this is exactly how my chosen charity works, I have to take my boxes of stuff to the warehouse.

    I've had occasional bargains in the past, including a little Olympus AF number that I picked up for £1.50, which only required a clean-out of the battery chamber to restore it, but that's much rarer these days.
    Alex

  8. #18

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    It's no different than eBay. Any item on eBay listed as "I don't know if it works or not" or it "just needs a new battery" are outright lies. Both equate to "This is a piece of junk but I won't sell it if i tell you the truth".

    Assume everything is broken unless assured otherwise. Even then, be prepared for the trully ignorant to give exception to the rule.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  9. #19
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I often wander thrift shops, often while my wife is sizing up my young boys for more pants. You would think they eat them, the rate that they blow out the knees to a state beyong another round of repair. The nice part of them wearing them out, as opposed to growing out of pants is that I know they are building an active part into thier lifestyle with their peers. Something that playing with their video games while laying around the house does not do.

    I frequently see all sorts of things that are no longer whole, but are great to get you thinking about how they could be used or repurposed. I whole bunch of light modifiers that I started out with for studio waork were found this way, and I still have a few of them. The cloth from an ugly framed japanese screen became a diffuser, a plant pot the genisis of a beauty dish. A large projector screen, woefully wounded with a matte white screen, became a bounce surface tacked to the ceiling of the studio. Its stand became a fill light stand, and the dead spring part went on the curb, and a metal scavenger took it overnight. Not a bad deal of the outlay of a whole $4.

    The camera section get looked at, but it is almost always full of cheap point and shoot 35mm cameras.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #20

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    I think it's better than throwing it out. I assume the cameras at a thrift store may not be working, and I also assume the people working there will know nothing about cameras.
    I think that if the camera is at the thrift store, at least there is a chance someone that knows about cameras will buy it and fix it. There is no chance of that if the camera is just thrown away.

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