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  1. #11
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Based on my own experience, I would suggest a Sekonic Studio L-398 from Freestyle. They are under $200. They are best bargain out there in a light meter, as far as I am concerned...and not only are they the best bargain, but the best bargain in this case also happens to be for the "best" meter, IMO. You will never need another incident ambient meter if you get this thing (and do not destroy it).
    Coolio! -- I'm too green and wet behind the ears to have developed any preferences. Just so happens my current photo instructor suggested checking out freestyle for supplies. Now, I most certainly will!

    Initially, I was thinking maybe the L-308S, or L-358 - but will add the L-398 to my wish list.

  2. #12

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    Using a Sekonic 328 flash & ambient. reflected & incident, compact & light weight. A very straightforward meter to use. I've also used Gossen Luna-Pro SBC that was very handy.
    The 308S or 358 will certainly do the job.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I have two that I use regularly.

    I've used my Gossen Profisix (Luna Pro SBC in the US) for years. I have the flash metering accessory, which I have used a lot, and an older enlarging meter accessory, that I've used rarely. There is also a spot meter attachment, which I don't have.

    The Profisix is a great meter for reflected, incident or flash operation. Apparently the spot meter accessory is also useful.

    The Profisix is, however, fairly large and therefore there are times I'm reluctant to take it with me.

    To deal with that, I've recently purchased a Gossen Digiflash. It isn't quite as convenient in operation as the Profisix, but it is very convenient to transport, and it is accurate and flexible.

    Matt

  4. #14
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    A digital meter seems to be one of the stupidest things that I could buy because with an analog meter you can look at all of the exposure possibilities that you have all laid out on a wheel.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  5. #15
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    I own a Luna Pro SBC, a Luna Pro F, and a Pentax Spotmeter V. They're all good. Both the SBC and F will accept various Gossen accessories that attach to the front of the meter, but the earlier Luna Pros will accept only the vari-angle attachment -- I believe. One nice thing about the SBC and the F is that they both use a standard 9v battery. So no worries about the 1.35v mercury batteries. The Spotmatic F uses the same batteries, as I dimly recall, as most Nikons. Takes three of them, I believe.

    To me, the Gossen Luna Pro F comes as close to an ideal multi-function meter as one will need in most instances. It's analog (which I prefer), meters down to extremely low light levels, handles incident and reflected light, meters flash, and accepts the vari-angle attachment, which, while not a true 1-degree spot meter, narrows the angle of acceptance down to a choice between 15 and 7.5 degrees. I have found the 7.5 setting to be almost as useful as a spot meter.

    The Luna Pro series are extremely accurate, durable, and very flexible in their capabilities. Plus, they sell for way less than the L-398 Sekonic over on fleaBay -- most BIN prices for the F range from $100 to $140, as of a couple of minutes ago. The vari-angle attachment can be had for another $30 or so over there.

    Best,
    Michael

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    A digital meter seems to be one of the stupidest things that I could buy because with an analog meter you can look at all of the exposure possibilities that you have all laid out on a wheel.
    Like this wheel:?

    Matt

    P.S. just because it has a digital display doesn't mean that it isn't eminently useful for analogue photography
    P.P.S. this is exactly the same display and dial as on the digiflash
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails digisix.jpg  

  7. #17
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    A few decades back, my experience with analog meters wasn't all that wonderful. For really sensitive metering, the analog meters are rather delicate. I had an original Gossen Lunasix in which the meter died after about four or five years. I mailed it to NYC and spent the price of a lesser meter to get it repaired, after which it was dead again in a matter of months -- just long enough to be out of the repair warranty!

    I currently have a Gossen Digsix, which I like. It feels like an empty plastic box, but works quite nicely. I more recently acquired a Sekonic L-508 which has a digital display and does incident, variable width (1 to 4º) spot for reflected light, and flash (which I've not really tried yet). It's fairly large, but not very heavy, and uses a good ol' AA cell for power. There are newer Sekonic models which may offer more features, but they are pricey (as are most high end meters).

    DaveT

  8. #18
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Like this wheel:?
    I didn't realize that they had meters like this. That is pretty neat. I still think that I would personally stick with an analog.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  9. #19
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    A digital meter seems to be one of the stupidest things that I could buy because with an analog meter you can look at all of the exposure possibilities that you have all laid out on a wheel.
    While I can understand where you're coming from, I find that in practice I can "visualise" the wheel in my head and "see" the combinations almost as well as on a physical wheel.

    After years of using analogue meters, I had the same thoughts/worries about using a digital one, but in practice they were mostly unfounded.

    BTW: Many people consider the Lunasix/Luna Pro as accurate, but at least the older CdS models have significant colour & linearity variations, even when using the right kind of batteries or substitutes.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  10. #20

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    I only buy meters that display EVs.
    No worries about displays (only one, in fact: does it display EVs). It's all i need.


    So with that concern out of the way, it's a toss up.
    Analog meters are a bit more delicate than digital ones.
    Both contain electronics. And with my meters at least, the electronic innards are the thingies that will eventually fail. Not the delicate meter mechanism.

    I use the Digisixes too, and absolutely love them.
    Not that they are without flaws.
    But still: small, and every bit as accurate as the larger ones.
    Plus an alarm and thermometer... what else can you ask for?
    (To be fair: the thermometer is not very good. You could hardly call it accurate.)


    CdS meters like the old Lunasix are indeed very accurate too. But rather slow to respond.
    And they hate strong light and need time to recover after having been exposed to it (memory effect).
    Last edited by Q.G.; 08-27-2009 at 11:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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