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  1. #1

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    What SLR focus screen do you use and why?

    I have been borrowing a friends camera with split prism screen for a while and I realise I really miss the microprism screen of my spotmatic. Seems to be a allround good option.

    What type of screen do you prefer? Is it a conscious choice?

    I do a lot of close focus work at about 0.5m, what do you think is a good option?

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The standard screen in all my Pentax's has been perfect so now wish to change. Should be fine for you too.

    Ian

  3. #3

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    I have an Olympus OM 1n with interchangeable screens and have been using the split prism + micro prisms the most on it.
    They work fast and presize.

    For MF I tend to use those focussing screens aswell.

    Peter

  4. #4

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    I use a focusing screen without any form of focusing help. I want the screen to be the same all over. I want to focus on any part of the screen and not only in the center. That makes my manual focusing better than AF because instead of focusing on 1 of the focusing point, by manually focusing the camera I can focus at any part of the screen. There is no need for the focus and then recompose.

  5. #5
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Many years ago, for general shooting, I preferred the plain matte focusing screen. However, when my eyesight changed, I discovered that I had a hard time focusing with the plain screen. I then had to change to a screen with a focusing aid. The split-image focusing aid works best for me for general shooting.

    When I do a lot of architectural photography or flat copy work, I use a screen with horizontal and vertical grid lines to help me with composition and the proper alignment of the subject.

    When I attach my camera to a telescope, I use a fine-ground Fresnel field screen with a 5.5mm clear spot and double cross hairs which allow me to perform parallax focusing on an aerial image.

  6. #6
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Split image screen with fresnel in my Nikon F. Not only is it the only screen I own, but I like the ease of which I can focus. However, I sometimes wish that it was turned at a 45* angle, to make it easier to focus on things.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  7. #7
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    Best screen in the World:
    The one on the Leicaflex SL; very fine micro-prisms all over the field (similar to Nikon's H screens but much better) with thicker ones at the centre.
    Can focus even long and dark telephotos easily anywhere on the screen.

    Second choice, any good screen with a grid.

    Absolute Junk:
    Those on AF cameras.
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  8. #8
    Allan Swindles's Avatar
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    I have replaced the split-image/microprism screens in all my OM bodies with plain fresnel types. I find them far less distracting. However, a recently purchased OM-4Ti body came with the first mentioned type and as my eyesight is not what it used to be I thought I would give it a try. I'm not sure I can stick with it though, useful, yes very, but so much clutter! I have a plain 1-4N screen to hand which I'm pretty certain will be in use before long.
    I'm into painting with light - NOT painting by numbers!

  9. #9
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    The split image on the Acute Matte D screen was too dark on my Hasselblad as I used lens with smaller apertures. The worst being the CF f/5.6 250mm lens. I replaced it with an Acute Matte D screen without a split image and I am much happier.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10

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    I use a screen specifically made for fast lenses whenever one is available. For Canon FD, this is the F screen, which is a microprism screen. Otherwise, I like a microprism for high contrast light and shooting action, and a split image screen in low contrast light (overcast, evening, etc.).
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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