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  1. #1

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    Rugged P&S-ish camera accurate enough for slides...

    I'm looking for a camera to take skiing. Since i'm shooting a bunch of slide film this winter I don't really have anything in my kit that can handle both the accuracy needed for slides, and is rugged enough (or cheap enough to replace) to not be an annoying liability. Budget depends on how certain I can be I won't need to replace it. $80 USD -ish if it's a brick, and $20-$30 if it's more a regular point and shoot.

    So far, i've looked at the XA, but i'm thinking the rangefinder will get knocked out of alignment in about an hour, meaning guesstimating focus. There's the XA2 with no rangefinder, but it's not exactly well liked from what i've read.

    I've also looked at the Canon Shureshot WP-1/A-1 but I can't find a whole lot of information about it that doesn't seem to conflict with other information, and i can't find anything about how fast the autofocus is, or just exactly how rugged or waterproof it is.

    Then there's the Nikonos stuff, but it's on the spendy side, and probably more than I really need.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    The XA and XA2 sound idea for your purposes-- the xa rangefinder is pretty durable, and with a 35mm f2.8 scale focus is not big deal. I've throughly abused my xa, including dropping it on a concrete floor, and it's still ticking. Metering is good on both. For snow shots you'll need to adjust the iso or use the backlight switch to avoid under exposure as you would on any auto exposure camera. Because the camera is so small and light you need to take care to hold it firmly to get sharp pictures. The Xa2 may actually be sharper.

    An olympus 35rc could be good choice too-- more control and a slightly sharper and less distorting lens.

  3. #3

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    Years ago my wife had a Canon Sureshot,both of us liked it for what it was.Took pretty good pictures,flash worked well and never had much of a problem with focus that I can remember.Had alot of tape holding the battery cover on,can't remember what happen to it .

  4. #4
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Yashica T4. My son has drop-kicked his down mountain paths a number of times and I'm still astounded at the great shots he gets.

  5. #5

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    I would head to a local thrift shop and pick up a handful of inexpensive point and shoots. If one gets damaged, you can simply toss it, knowing that you have a few more in reserve.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    Yashica T4. My son has drop-kicked his down mountain paths a number of times and I'm still astounded at the great shots he gets.
    yes!
    the T4!
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  7. #7

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    I found a T4 at a garage sale for $1. I couldn't believe my luck. Couldn't resist reselling it though at the fantasy land prices..

  8. #8
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I've tried the Nikon L35AF and the Olympus Trip 35. Both about $5. Both will expose Kodachrome accurately. Ken Rockwell has reviews on both of them.

  9. #9
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    The Canon Sureshot line is pretty good.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  10. #10
    phenix's Avatar
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    I had 3 AF-P&S, and also used a 4th belonging to a friend.

    The Canon Sureshot stooped working at the first roll, during a winter. I’ve put new batteries in it when starting to shot, and also changed the batteries when got back home, but it vain. Still, it came back to life after 2-3 months, but stopped again before finishing the next roll. One year later started working again and continued to work for other 3 rolls, after which I gave it away. I heard it still worked before the person went digital. I do not recommend it.

    The Nikon One-Touch is my best P&S. Bought it defective at a church sale, but after opening it and mounting a spring back, I never had a problem with it. It has a low contrast VERY high resolution lens (colors are very natural), and despite the usual behavior of Tessar-type lenses, it works beautiful large open and gets vignetting when aperture closes down. This is why I use it for architecture, street, and indoors where small group portraits are incredibly beautiful. Colors are just like those produced by my YashicaMat. Focus is fantastic, even at f/2.8 and 1m close, on any lighting (even in dark). Two weaknesses: it only gets DX films (no possibility to set the speed manually), and the lens does not accept filters (still, an adapter for filters can be easily found on the bay). I wouldn’t recommend it for winter shots, or any other scenics in plenty of light, because of the vignetting issue. Otherwise, it is the best AF-P&S I’ve ever seen.

    A Ricoh 35 AF (or so), with a threaded lens barrel allowing to mount 46mm filters. Beautiful camera, with a high contrast Tessar-tipe lens. It gets vignetting when wide open, although works just fine. I used it especially in landscape for highly saturated colors. Focus only showed errors in total darkness and on dark objects (although it has a red focussing beam). Because it can get filters, I use it in B&W, mostly outdoors. But I also would recommend it for slides, because of its capability to saturate colors. Colors are just like those produced by my Rollei B35.

    Yashica T* (4?), also works beautiful. The lens is contrasty and shows a surprisingly high resolution too (maybe the accutance is very well balanced to both saturate the colors and create the feeling of high resolution). Colors are in the Olympus style, if I can say so (I don’t have an Olympus, but I have seen pictures done with a Zuico lens on the same film I was using). The weaknesses of this camera are: the largest aperture being only f/3.5, and the lake of filter thread. But the force, especially during the winter, is that it is powered by large 6V(?) lithium battery (expensive, but long life). I would recommend it especially for slides and/or winter shots.
    B&W is silver.

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