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  1. #11
    flash26c's Avatar
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    Gee, when I was shooting my F100, I shot in shutter priority and if I set exposure comp, the shutter speed moved to my desired setting. In manual, comp exposure set in one direction when the button was pushed; then to add the comp to my setting after the button was released, you had to move the adjustment to bring the meter to center. After all, exposure compensation is just changing the amount of light hitting your film no matter how you do it or with any camera. My compensation with my view camera is more or less light reaching the film set by me manually.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    Even with manual cameras. Let's say the ASA 100 film says you need 1/60 and f8. If you change the ASA to 50, leaving the aperture alone results in a required shutter speed of 1/30, or, +1.
    What if I need +1/3-stop? What will the meter suggest if I set the ASA to 80? 1/45 and f8?

    That wouldn't really work, because I cannot turn the shutter dial to 1/45, but only either 1/60 or 1/30.

    In this case, the only option I would have is to set the aperture ring position on the lens somewhere between f5.6 and f8.

  3. #13
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    ???

    Of course for experienced users, adjusting the aperture or the shutter speed (on those few lovely cameras which allow manual intermediate speeds ) directly for a 1/2 stop compensation is preferable.

    But I don't understand why you claim that ISO adjustment won't work on a manual camera...
    I only mean it won't work in this case on a manual camera to get 1/3 or 1/2 stop compensation as it would on an auto camera. It is an old time trick to use on an auto exposure camera to set compensation where the auto circuits can choose shutter speeds steplessly. And that is why some people recommended it here, perhaps not knowing he has a fully manual camera. Sorry for the confusion.

    ps I would just use the in-between aperture settings.

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    Last edited by Jon Shiu; 11-03-2009 at 01:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by flash26c View Post
    Gee, when I was shooting my F100, I shot in shutter priority and if I set exposure comp, the shutter speed moved to my desired setting. In manual, comp exposure set in one direction when the button was pushed; then to add the comp to my setting after the button was released, you had to move the adjustment to bring the meter to center. After all, exposure compensation is just changing the amount of light hitting your film no matter how you do it or with any camera. My compensation with my view camera is more or less light reaching the film set by me manually.
    Agreed. That is what I like to achieve = a more precise control of how much light is hitting the film. My manual camera only gives me an option of either doubling or halving the exposure.

    For example: I'm metering a scene (or the subject on the scene to be more accurate) and the TTL meter suggests that 1/125 at f8 on ISO100 film is slightly overexposed (in which case I would see a middle green dot and the green "+" sign above it both light up). Okay, I have plenty of leeway (or so I think) so I turn the dial to 1/250, and now the meter says it's slightly underexposed (the middle green dot and the red minus underneath it light up). So, I have a subject that is lit in the way that is somewhere in between the values I can set on the camera.

    *Sign*

    Not sure how to deal with that

  5. #15
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Jon Shiu;888827]I only mean it won't work in this case on a manual camera to get 1/3 or 1/2 stop compensation as it would on an auto camera. It is an old time trick to use on an auto exposure camera to set compensation where the auto circuits can choose shutter speeds steplessly. And that is why some people recommended it here, perhaps not knowing he has a fully manual camera. /QUOTE]

    I was confused because, in fact, most lenses, even with full-stop clicks, allow intermediate settings (even if not fully stepless, I can easily adjust almost all of my lenses - including Nikon - to within 1/4 stop).
    Also some manual exposure cameras allow stepless adjustment of the shutter speed (usually with a few limitations).

    But I have several times used ISO compensation on a manual camera, even if it isn't my favourite method.
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  6. #16
    Leighgion's Avatar
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    This doesn't address the exact problem presented, but I feel it's worth asking... what kind of film are you shooting?

    If you're shooting negative film, you have a lot of latitude so rather than agonize over pleasing the camera's meter exactly, I'd just shoot the slight overexposure and call it good.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rol_Lei Nut View Post
    I was confused because, in fact, most lenses, even with full-stop clicks, allow intermediate settings (even if not fully stepless, I can easily adjust almost all of my lenses - including Nikon - to within 1/4 stop).
    Also some manual exposure cameras allow stepless adjustment of the shutter speed (usually with a few limitations).

    But I have several times used ISO compensation on a manual camera, even if it isn't my favourite method.
    That is the consensus I can see here so far: using the lens's aperture ring to adjust for a more precise exposure. I even like it way better than messing around with ISO settings (don't want to accidentally forget to set it back to default for the film).

    I have a Cosina 80-210mm lens, but will buy a Nikkor 28-70mm lens as well soon. I am not much impressed with the former one, but it does have a click-stop aperture ring.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leighgion View Post
    This doesn't address the exact problem presented, but I feel it's worth asking... what kind of film are you shooting?

    If you're shooting negative film, you have a lot of latitude so rather than agonize over pleasing the camera's meter exactly, I'd just shoot the slight overexposure and call it good.
    I shoot mostly 50% color negative, 30% black & white negative, and about 20% color transparency (and that's where I would like to have a more precise control of the exposure).

  8. #18

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    I tried turning the aperture ring between the stops and it worked! That's the easiest way I found so far! Thank you guys for all your help!!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apertureman View Post
    Agreed. That is what I like to achieve = a more precise control of how much light is hitting the film. My manual camera only gives me an option of either doubling or halving the exposure.

    For example: I'm metering a scene (or the subject on the scene to be more accurate) and the TTL meter suggests that 1/125 at f8 on ISO100 film is slightly overexposed (in which case I would see a middle green dot and the green "+" sign above it both light up). Okay, I have plenty of leeway (or so I think) so I turn the dial to 1/250, and now the meter says it's slightly underexposed (the middle green dot and the red minus underneath it light up). So, I have a subject that is lit in the way that is somewhere in between the values I can set on the camera.

    *Sign*

    Not sure how to deal with that
    Just adjust the aperture until the light is green without the + sign and leave the shutter speed alone. The aperture will stay wherever you put it. In this case it would be around 8 1/3.
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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    Just adjust the aperture until the light is green without the + sign and leave the shutter speed alone. The aperture will stay wherever you put it. In this case it would be around 8 1/3.
    Thank you, johnnywalker, this seems to be working great so far!!

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