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  1. #1

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    Low quality photos (Canon EOS Rebel T2)

    I received as a gift an SLR 35mm Canon EOS Rebel T2 a few years back, and I have never been satisfied with the quality of the pictures. It seems that my Pentax point-and-shoot that I got in 1991 took better pictures, especially in low lighting situations. I am not a "photographer", just someone who loves to take pictures and wants to always capture the moment, so I don't need the best quality but want my pictures to look good.

    My question is what could be the reasons/fixes for my pictures always looking dark, lacking clarity (not necessarily blurry), and not having vibrant colors. I use the auto mode on the camera, a Quantaray 28-90mm lense, the built-in flash, and have used 800, 400, and 200 film (usually Fuji). I don't think it's the camera because it's practically new still since I haven't use it much, but I think it is either the lens or most likely the flash not being sufficient enough in the low-level lighting? I had no problem with my Pentax P&S in low-level lighting, so I was expecting the SLR to provide at least the same, if not better, results. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    examples

    couple of examples from the 200 film I used on Halloween. I can probably find other examples from previous film shot that would be 400 ISO film. I just feel like my pictures don't look vibrant, kind of dingy (these examples are actually not as bad as some of the others, but I don't want to show the full faces of my nephews on the net).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DomBran Oct 2009.jpg   Oct 2009.jpg  
    Last edited by kman543210; 11-04-2009 at 04:07 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: adding content

  3. #3
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Buy or borrow some prime lens (some 50mm /1.8 or something) and try it again. For sure it will be good.

  4. #4
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    I reccomend trying some new films or maybe trying a lab to process them....You may want to try some Kodak Portra 400VC. Where are you having your film processed?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Learn to shoot on manual, and stop letting the camera dictate the exposure. when its on auto mode, it averages the exposure, hence the average looking pix. Also either remove the flash to a bracket mount(off the shoe) or get a bounce flash(regardless) this will minimize the harsh shadows, maybe even a flash diffuser. Next, keep on shooting, more practice, and thought about composition and exposure,you'll soon start to produce better quality. IMO its not the equiptment, or the film, its all about the operator.

    Rick

  6. #6

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    My guess is that the issue is mostly the direct flash on the camera. The lens (Quantaray?) may be a contributing factor also.

    I would try to find a cheap flash that you can bounce off the ceiling. I doubt the problem is the film, I use the Fuji 800s (superia & pro) all the time and they're great films.

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The lens may be an issue, some of the mid range zooms were quite poor performers, only the big 5 manufacturers lenses and the Vivitar S1 & Tamron SP lenses were really up to scratch. I certainly wouldn't trust that zoom.

    Ian

  8. #8

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    It could be the lens. Try a good prime lense.

    Jeff

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The lens is nothing special, but I'd say the light is a bigger factor in these kinds of shots. Unfortunately, you can't do much with a built in flash. With a separate shoe mount flash, you can usually swivel the head and point it toward the ceiling, so it isn't so harsh.

    You've also got some other issues going on, like holding the camera level. If you've got straight lines at the edge of the frame, try lining up the edge of the frame in the viewfinder with, say, the edge of the ceiling or a cabinet door. Try getting a little closer to your subject, and think about shooting vertical instead of horizontal, when a horizontal shot is going to include a lot of extraneous stuff.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #10

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    Are you using Fuji Film 200 that comes in a box of 4 and labeled Indoor & Outdoor? If so, I have almost an identical photos in terms of lacking sharpness, cleanliness, and contrast right here. In every which way I tried to evaluate the print, it was wrong. I looked at the negative under a microscope and I also saw problems. It was so bad that I also doubted my equipment that I was testing. I showed them to my girlfriend who is not a photographer and even she saw they weren't the best. When I took more with B&W and processed it myself, the results were totally different. My guess is, your problem is either film or processing, or both. My suggestion to you is to use different film, possibly a professional film, and send it to a good lab, then re-evaluate.

    True, exposure may not be perfect but a lot of that can be adjusted during printing. True, lens may not be the best, but unless defective, they are not so bad that it will produce images that would readily dissatisfy someone who claims to be "not a photographer." Of course, if it is defective, all bets are off. I even had a bad Nikon prime lens fresh out of factory!

    Before resorting to some expensive experiment, get a fresh film, from a different manufacturer, send it to a good lab (I'm sure someone here can recommend?), and review again.

    Good luck!

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