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  1. #1

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    Reloading roll back into same 35mm camera?

    When reloading a roll that has had a few frames shot back into the same camera (EOS-1V) that it was shot in before, is it safe to advance right back to the same frame that you left off on? Or do you need to advance one or two beyond?

    Jared

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Go a couple beyond to be on the safe side.

    Ian

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    David William White's Avatar
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    One thing you can do (esp. for planned multiple exposures) is to register your film when you load it. Put a registration mark with a Sharpie somewhere on your film transport guide. When you load a fresh roll, mark the film where it lines up with your registration mark. Write the frame number on the tongue when you unload a partial roll, then line it up when you reload it. Should be bang on.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by David William White View Post
    One thing you can do (esp. for planned multiple exposures) is to register your film when you load it. Put a registration mark with a Sharpie somewhere on your film transport guide. When you load a fresh roll, mark the film where it lines up with your registration mark. Write the frame number on the tongue when you unload a partial roll, then line it up when you reload it. Should be bang on.
    Would that have to be done in the darkroom, though?

  5. #5
    Lee L's Avatar
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    I always go +2 on the frame count. Be sure to cover the lens when advancing and throwing the shutter. I always set a high shutter speed and small aperture, just in case. Also, reloading can sometimes be a problem with transparency film, depending on the lab. Some automated cutters don't check frame spacing, and some operators don't pay a lot of attention. Might be worth asking the lab about their setup in advance if re-loading partially shot slide film.

    Lee

  6. #6

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    I always go +1. Film is cheap, so +2 is OK too.

    I've done this too many times to count and never had a problem with it. I've even switched mid-roll from one camera to a different camera. In that case, I usually go +2.

  7. #7
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Auto wind I will always advance a frame. My Minoltas where the film is slipped into the gear on that little notch, I just pick up where I started with no worries. Do it all the time.
    Thank you.
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  8. #8

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    "Also, reloading can sometimes be a problem with transparency film, depending on the lab. Some automated cutters don't check frame spacing, and some operators don't pay a lot of attention."

    Uh oh, I am shooting Velvia 50. I have been getting my film developed at Wal-Mart; they only charge $6.88 a roll for 36 exposures. The local camera shop that still develops E-6 charges $13.99 IIRC. I am willing to wait 2 weeks to pay half as much.

    Jared

  9. #9
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jphendren View Post
    Uh oh, I am shooting Velvia 50. I have been getting my film developed at Wal-Mart; they only charge $6.88 a roll for 36 exposures. The local camera shop that still develops E-6 charges $13.99 IIRC. I am willing to wait 2 weeks to pay half as much.

    Jared
    My understanding is that WalMart sends all transparency film to Dwayne's through Fuji. I'm not sure how closely they watch for frame spacing shifts in mid-roll. They do run a lot of film, and I've been happy with their quality since starting to shoot slides again in the last year or two.

    I send to Dwaynes through a local drug store chain's Fuji pickup. My K-14 and E-6 is $5.99 for 36 exposures there from the same lab and courier as WalMart, and they're only 2 miles away, half a mile closer than WalMart.

    Lee

  10. #10
    David William White's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apertureman View Post
    Would that have to be done in the darkroom, though?
    No, perhaps I wasn't clear. Register the film when first loaded, before you advance to 1. Rewind film leaving leader out when you want to unload. Write frame number down, say, on the tongue. When you reload that roll, re-register against the mark you originally made. Advance to the frame number you left off at.

    No 'safety' margin needed. No darkroom needed. Obviously only if you anticipate changing rolls.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

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