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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry06GT View Post
    .
    I used to own that same 2.8 Sigma lens, and it is every bit as good as the Nikon glass. It is not an inexpensive lens, and has great build quality. Sigma denotes build quality with either a red stripe (pro-sumer) or a gold stripe (pro quality) around the lens.
    Here's the one I am contemplating about:



    What do you think?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Ah, if you do available light, and are interested in bargains, then I think you will be much happier with a used 50mm f1.4 (or even f2.0, a better bargain) Nikkor. You don't mention your camera, but if you are looking for manual focus real bargains can be had in AI'ed and AI rather than AIS lenses; the 'S' is only needed for shutter priority automation. The older lenses are better built, too. You can probably find a set of older 28/50/85mm primes for about the same price as the Sigma zoom.

    Real bargains can be had by buying engraved lenses - where some anal-retentive has etched his name on the barrel. The upside is that anal retentives tend to otherwise take very good care of their equipment (assuming they use it all) and the engraving can often take 2/3 off the price.
    That's a good idea. Although, I am aiming at buying a lens/lenses that would work for both 35mm Film and Digital SLR's. I don't have a DSLR but would not like to get a whole new set of lenses once I add one to my arsenal. I am not sure older lenses would be compatible with dig's.

    I do love the wide aperture of those lenses, though.

  3. #13
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    One thing hard to tell from the picture is the great feel of the nicely textured surface treatment. It is a black splatter paint over a solid plastic barrel. The wide rubber focus and zoom ring are nicely dampend. I never used the focus ring (the thin one up front) as the F100 took care of that chore.

    Mine had some creep if you pointed it stright down (model laying on the grass, I was standing over her photographing a close up of her face). You just keep one finger on the zoom ring. It is a big lens.
    .

  4. #14

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    This is the one I wanted to buy first ($139) but now changed my mind:


  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    The one I have (can't bring myself to sell such a turkey) has no stripe - I guess that indicates it has no quality, which it doesn't. Wish I had known...
    I had two of them myself. My first "modern" camera was a N80 that the, um, folks at Wolf bundled with a two lens Sigma set of the same (lack) of no stripe quality.

    To be fair, at the time I was as cheap as the lenses, lol.
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry06GT View Post
    .
    One thing hard to tell from the picture is the great feel of the nicely textured surface treatment. It is a black splatter paint over a solid plastic barrel. The wide rubber focus and zoom ring are nicely dampend. I never used the focus ring (the thin one up front) as the F100 took care of that chore.

    Mine had some creep if you pointed it stright down (model laying on the grass, I was standing over her photographing a close up of her face). You just keep one finger on the zoom ring. It is a big lens.
    .
    Thanks for the input pal!

    The bulk and weight don't scare me a bit. It's the quality and clarity I'm after. The reason it's so big, my guess, is because it has to allow a lot more light to pass through it, so ultimately all the optic elements are bigger.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apertureman View Post
    This is the one I wanted to buy first ($139) but now changed my mind:

    .

    The down side is that the lens is f/2.8 at 28mm only, then it goes to f/4 rather quickly, about at 35mm. On a "modern" cameras we call this "dark glass" or "slow glass".

    Once you get a digital (most people do) you will want the faster glass, unless weight is an issue (if you are a hiker). Check the weight and size specs, they are quite different.

    The $200 dollars you save will be wasted when you upgrade.
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  8. #18
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    One VERY important thing to consider. Many of the new Sigma lenses DO NOT have adjustable f stops. The aperature is controlled by the camera electronically.

    If you have an older manual camera, you cannot use a lens that you cannot change the aperature on, well you can, but you have to shoot wide open (I think).

    Check this CAREFULLY.
    .

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apertureman View Post
    Here's the one I am contemplating about:



    What do you think?
    It is at least a DG version, which means full frame (versus DC which can only be used on APS-C digital camera's), and in turn means it can be used on an analog camera.

    The EX denotion stands for the topline lenses of Sigma. Most tests I have seen of the EX lenses, generally give them high notes... I have no problems with my Sigma F2.8 28-70 EX, which was actually from the first EX series lenses Sigma produced. I must admit I don't regularly shoot at wide open, so in terms of sharpness at wide open, I can't really give advice. Anything upwards of F5.6 is good, at least when shot from tripod!... (the effect of which many people underestimate)

    One thing you should take note of the extra stop under low light, which may not be as important in terms of shutter speeds, but more in terms of comfort while composing... At F4.0 and especially higher, your camera's viewfinder can become very dark under low light conditions, making manual focusing impossible.
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    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry06GT View Post
    .
    One VERY important thing to consider. Many of the new Sigma lenses DO NOT have adjustable f stops. The aperature is controlled by the camera electronically.

    If you have an older manual camera, you cannot use a lens that you cannot change the aperature on, well you can, but you have to shoot wide open (I think).

    Check this CAREFULLY.
    .
    You mean they don't have a manually adjustable aperture ring? I have a Nikon FM10, which is an all manual camera, so I guess I may run into problems. I am shopping around for a more automated SLR, though, like F100 or F80, so it's not a deterrent.

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