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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    One thing I've learned from shooting a variety of formats is to use each format for what each it does best, and it's hard to know what 35mm does really well before you've had a chance to shoot medium or large format. I've tried some bird photography with medium and even large format, for instance, and often it just isn't worth doing, because there are so few situations where you can get an interesting shot without a long fast lens, a focal plane shutter, and a small format. On the other hand, I've discovered that wide lenses are more interesting on larger formats, because 35mm often doesn't have enough resolution to render all the information that a wide lens can take in, unless the composition is fairly simple.

    Then there are other issues about what you can do best with an SLR, rangefinder, TLR, or a view camera, that are separate from questions of format size.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    because 35mm often doesn't have enough resolution to render all the information that a wide lens can take in, unless the composition is fairly simple.
    It doesn't? Definitely not the case with my images, David. And the best art is that which has simple composition devoid of clutter and makes the best use of the chosen format i.e. "fit the subject to the frame", not the frame to the subject. Much of the LF work I see contains so much unallocated space and edge clutter; it's not used optimally. NO denying though if you want to go from big to bigger to biggest (mural size), LF is the way to go, but I'd still much prefer better, more optimal use of the huge additional space rather than have distracting blank swathes, messy edges and overall poor composition.

    I agree many other issues separate from this that suit SLRs and view cameras, but the same comments apply to framing optimally with no waste.

  3. #13
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    35mm is about convenience and speed. If toting medium or large format gear and working at a slower pace are not problems, then the larger negative will always produce superior results. Of course the content of a photo can be of little value in any format; but presumably this thread is about technical quality, not artistic quality.
    Charles Hohenstein

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Chazzy,
    Technical quality as well as conceptual/artistic quality go hand-in-hand in professional practice. It's something drummed into you in art school (well, at least here!).

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    It doesn't?
    Depends what you're intentions are of course, but textures are different with different formats, and the relation of the part to the whole depends on how clearly one can render the part. Joel Meyerowitz, for instance, said that he shot his Ground Zero project in 8x10", because the larger format is simply a better tool for description of detail on an absolute level, and I would say that is true even with small prints, where you're trying to depict an immense subject and show what is happening at the same time on a human scale. Burtynsky works this way as well, where you might first see a vast industrial landscape, and then realize that there are people in the landscape, and you can see in some detail what they are doing. I had this revelation myself some years ago making photographs in a market square with an ultrawide 120mm lens on 8x10", and looking over the contact print with a loupe, I could find all these little mini-narratives going on that described the life of the market square, and I couldn't have done that with a small format.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16

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    The main reasons have been mentioned of course, but there can be another IMO. The difference in DOF (and DOFocus) can sometimes be an advantage in 35mm. Generally speaking, you can also "get a shot" easier in low light in 35mm - slower shutter speeds, more DOF at a given aperture. I know there a plently of MF RFers that can be handheld at slower speeds, but not as much as in the smaller format.

  7. #17
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    I have no reason to record the world I see at 1/60 @ f/32. That is the World of The Obvious.
    At 1/60 @ f/2, you are walking in the Realm of the Sacred, and every moment is a chance to peer into Eternity.
    I shoot 8x10 to fart around. My Leica is for REAL pictures.


    Technical quality as well as conceptual/artistic quality go hand-in-hand in professional practice. It's something drummed into you in art school (well, at least here!).

    Garyh: I suggest you get a refund as soon as possible.

  8. #18

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    You have to pick youre camera type to the images you need to make. A lot of the time i would prefer to use a mf camera but couldn"t because its just to difficult to get the the images with anything but a 35mm camera. Dont forget that 35mm is capable of amazing quality if used correctly. Also keeping your'e photographs a bit smaller helps a lot. Don

  9. #19

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    I haven't used a 135 camera for any of my personal stuff since I was sixteen years old. However, if I wanted extreme portability, or to shoot action/sports, or high mag macro, or very long lenses... I'd get a 135 camera and the optics/accessories to support those needs. There are many things a 135 just does better or at least far more conveniently than MF or especially LF.

  10. #20
    Aurum's Avatar
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    To me 35mm is the bread and butter of film photography.
    Acceptable for a lot of things, and not much to dislike

    MF, well to paraphrase a UK commercial of a famous Chain store over here

    There is film photography, and then there is MF film photography

    (Nigella Lawson optional)
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

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