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  1. #11
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Depends how important that your master negative be in 35mm format. If you use a 120 camera, then you can either crop or cut the negative.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  2. #12
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    I have a Rolleikin for my Rollei, and it works really well. I have only used it for color, but have been satisfied.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  3. #13

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    Being as young as I am (21), I doubt I'll be in this area (northern Ohio) for more than 5 years before I move to warmer climates.
    I'd eventually like the option to move to 120 when the opportunity for cheaper development arises, but for now 35mm is all that is financially sane. I can get slide film done very cheaply too thanks to a good friend.

    On developing my own film: I will soon develop my own Black and White, but the c41 process is more expensive to do. I'd rather get my color film done at a local shop that I trust does a good job.

    I want a TLR for both the "aesthetic" and "feel" of a TLR as well as the option to eventually switch to Medium format when I move somewhere that 120 is more easily developed.

    Right now, it looks like i'll be doing the Rollei + rolleikin option.

    Any more information that I could use? Anyone want to keep the discussion alive?

  4. #14

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    There is always the granddaddy of 35mm TLRs. One of the most magnificent cameras ever made -- the Zeiss Ikon Contaflex.

    It was released in 1936. It has interchangeable lenses -- they were among the best available in the world at that time. It had a selenium meter and framelines inside the viewfinder for 5, 8.5 and 13.5cm. It was insanely expensive in the 1930s, and today it's still insanely expensive ... at least for a classic camera.

    Of course, after buying the camera, you won't have any money left for film for a long time to come.

  5. #15

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    For a less expensive alternative, there's always the Bolsey TLR (35mm) and the Agfa Optima Reflex, which is a combination TLR/SLR.

  6. #16

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    And don't forget about the unforgettable Samocaflex and the Toyocaflex. True 'native' 35mm TLR's.

  7. #17

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    And you can get 35mm backs for the Bronica ETRS and SQa cameras. Great cameras, great lenses, just switch backs to go back to 120 and relatively inexpensive now a days.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    To expand on Joe's point, there were waist level finders for the Nikon F and F2. I don't know about later models.

    Using a waist level finder on a 35mm body will force you into a horizontal perspective. Using a 35mm adapter on a TLR, will force you into a vertical perspective (and a short telephoto effect). I don't know which, if either, you prefer. But I think that a WLF on a 35mm body will give you better results than a 35mm adapter on a TLR.
    There is a WLF finder available for the F3 as well. I have one, and it is an awfully small image that's hard to focus unless you use the built in magnifier or have very good young eyes. Using the camera in a vertical orientation is also quite a chore with this finder. It's not the thing for casual street shooting.
    Frank Schifano

  9. #19
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
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    Just found this web page, dedicated to 35mm TLRs. Hope this helps.

    http://www.fotografiareflex.net/tlr35new.html

    Roger

  10. #20
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSohnly View Post
    I'd eventually like the option to move to 120 when the opportunity for cheaper development arises, but for now 35mm is all that is financially sane. I can get slide film done very cheaply too thanks to a good friend.

    Right now, it looks like i'll be doing the Rollei + rolleikin option.
    Oh, good grief! Use a 35mm camera!

    You're worried about the cost of processing the film, but you think buying a Rollei is the answer?

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