Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,593   Posts: 1,546,092   Online: 917
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1
    sjg
    sjg is offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southampton, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11

    Manual or AF 20mm nikon lens

    Another wide angle lens question... would I find it difficult using a manual focus 20mm lens on a nikon F100, as opposed to one with AF?

    My reasoning goes like this:
    with such a wide angle lens, most of the world is in focus, most of the time, so critical focus is probably not a big issue, and I'll save enough to almost afford a 50mm AF too.
    BUT I guess the F100 (I've not bought this yet) will have a plain matte screen and maybe an in focus indicator, similar to my digital - I'm used to the standard split screen on my OM2 and don't feel confident in manual with the digital.

    A little more background:
    I've a lovely nikon 70-300 G VR lens which I'd like to use with film and believe the F100 would support all the clever stuff this lens can do, however I would like my next nikon lenses to be able to operate with as wide a range of bodies as possible, so that I'd be able to consider an older nikon body at a later date.

    Does my reasoning make sense, or is there a high likelihood I'll regret the combination?

    Cheers, Simon

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    I use the 20mm f/3.5 Ais lens on my F100 frequently. Can't do matrix metering with that lens on the F100, but that doesn't matter much. Center weighted average metering with the camera set to aperture priority mode works well for me most of the time. When it won't, I simply make athe adjustment. As far as focus goes, the indicator can get a little dodgy if you're trying to lock on to something relatively far away. Again it doesn't matter much. You have so much DOF. As long as you're reasonably close to correct, it'll be fine.
    Frank Schifano

  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Indeed, I never understood the point of AF on an ultrawide. But anyway, you might look at photodo and photozone.de to see if they have charts on the various offerings in this focal length. Best would be to try it out for yourself....
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Napoli
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    46
    what would you be shooting?

    There is a focus indicator on the body.

  5. #5
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,132
    I have a 20mm Nikon, focus is not a problem.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  6. #6
    sjg
    sjg is offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southampton, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11
    I'll be using it for landscapes and some interiors, nothing that is moving too quickly

    Keith : I'd love to be able to try the lens out - but it's in Grays at the moment... , and I tend to hold onto all my purchases, even those I'm regretted

    Simon

  7. #7
    Rol_Lei Nut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hamburg
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,118
    I'm also not an AF fan and find that AF on an ultrawide such as a 20mm completely useless.

    Go for the best optical quality. AF will just focus on the wrong points anyway...
    M6, SL, SL2, R5, P6x7, SL3003, SL35-E, F, F2, FM, FE-2, Varex IIa

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    580
    I received a Nikon AF 20mm as a gift. Focusing is not a problem. Great pictures.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    I think you'll find that for landscapes, the 20 mm is really wide - often too wide. Forget the idea of finely detailed, sweeping perspectives from 35 mm film. It's ain't happening. The negatives are too small and the images recorded on them are minuscule. It is kind of nice for interior shots though, and works really well if you can light up the interior nicely. Still, you need to be careful. Ultra wide lenses for SLR's tend to have quite a bit of barrel distortion and Nikkors are no exception. Additionally the f/3.5 lens is a bit slow for hand held work, and anything faster will come with a very high price tag and not stellar performance when used at very wide apertures.
    Frank Schifano

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Woking, Surrey, UK
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    475
    Images
    27
    Another suggestion, if you're trying to keep costs down: Rather than buy a 20mm Nikkor, I bought a 19-35mm Tamron AF zoom for less than half the price. Yes, I would have prefered the light, compact 20mm that matches my other MF Nikkors and takes the same size filters, but at the time I couldn't afford the difference in cost (still can't, due to an impending wedding!). The Tamron is AF-D, and fully AI compatible.

    Ian

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin